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We All Know Someone Like This Waitress. It's So Satisfying To See Her Get What's Coming To Her.

It's incredibly satisfying to see someone get what she deserves. Especially when she deserves the best.

We All Know Someone Like This Waitress. It's So Satisfying To See Her Get What's Coming To Her.
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JCPenney

Meet Chelsea.

She waits tables at a restaurant. She works hard. Her coworkers love her.


She's struggling.

Her car is falling apart. She's barely making ends meet. People who work in food service don't make much money. The federal minimum wage for people who get paid with tips is just over $2 an hour. Chelsea does everything she can to give her customers the best possible service, but she's not getting ahead.

She gives back.

Like so many people, Chelsea doesn't have much money to give, but she does offer her time to people. An eating disorder survivor, she volunteers as a yoga teacher for people who are walking that same path.

It's about time she gets a break.

The fun folks at Break are "pranking it forward," giving her the best shift ever. She's getting a new car, a Hawaii vacation, a $1,000 tip, and more.

Oh, and she tries to share that tip with her coworkers because she's really that kind of person.

It's time for the rest of us to support servers.

Why does a great person like Chelsea, who is generous with her coworkers, volunteers her time, and has overcome personal challenges, have to depend on her customers — who might be forgetful, bad at math, or having a bad day — for her living? Every server has a story about getting stiffed by a table that ran them ragged and then left a tiny tip or nothing at all. For each crazy wonderful tip story, there are a thousand bums. The fact is, most servers in this country are struggling. It's time we give back to them.

So what can you do?

Tip well, yes, but more importantly, support raising the minimum wage for servers. It's been the same since 1991.

Speak up when you eat out. When the manager comes to your table after the meal, tell them: "The meal was great, but I would love to see your workers be paid well and get the kinds of workplace protections, like paid sick days, that would make their lives livable."

And, of course, don't be a bum. Tip as well as you can.

Let's see if we can give every server in the country the best shift ever.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.