Victoria's Secret models are asking the company to step up and address its culture of misogyny

Between 2016 and 2018, the market share of Victoria's Secret in the U.S. dropped from 33% to 24%, as the company had received criticism for being behind the times. When it comes to our underwear, we want comfort over sex appeal, and when it comes to businesses, we want them to be harassment-free. The New York Times recently published a piece detailing a culture of "misogyny, bullying and harassment" at Victoria's Secret.

"This abuse was just laughed off and accepted as normal. It was almost like brainwashing. And anyone who tried to do anything about it wasn't just ignored. They were punished," Casey Crowe Taylor, a former public relations employee at Victoria's Secret, told the Times.


The allegations weren't much of a surprise. L Brands CEO Leslie Wexner had been tied to Jeffrey Epstein, and chief marketing officer Ed Razek stepped down last year following transphobic and fatphobic comments. Five months ago, the Model Collective (an organization that advocates for the protection of models) met with L Brands/Victoria's Secret, asking the company to "take concrete action to change its culture of misogyny and abuse."

RELATED: Victoria's Secret model Karlie Kloss says she quit modeling after studying feminist theory

It did not, and the Model Alliance sent the company an open letter after the New York Times piece came out, calling out the bad behavior at Victoria's Secret. "The time for listening is long past; it's time for Victoria's Secret to take action to protect the people they profit from," the letter reads. "Human rights violations can't be stopped with a corporate rebranding exercise."

"The Model Alliance believes in safety, freedom to work without fear of harassment, and real consequences for abusers. Victoria's Secret's failure to create an environment of accountability, both in-house and in their interactions with a network of agencies and creatives, undermines these values. We envision an industry in which creative expression flourishes and everyone can work without fear of harassment or abuse," the letter continues.

The letter also outlines details of the RESPECT Program, a Model Alliance that is, according to the letter, the "only existing accountability program designed by and for models." Some of the proposed changes include requiring employees and photographers to follow a code of conduct.

The letter has been signed by over 100 models, including some of the biggest names in the industry. Christy Turlington Burns, Amber Valletta, Edie Campbell, and Amanda de Cadenet have all signed the letter.

RELATED: Target's new swimwear line features a diverse group of models, proving all bodies are beautiful

L Brands responded to the letter, saying they're on the same page. "We absolutely share a common goal with Model Alliance to ensure the safety and wellbeing of models. Our robust Photo Shoot Procedures, including training and oversight, were implemented in May 2019 and reflect elements of the RESPECT Program and beyond. We're proud of the progress we've made and remain committed to continuous improvement. We're always open to engage with those looking to make improvements in the industry," L Brands said in a statement.

Actions speak louder than words, and the only way Victoria's Secret can be better is by doing better. A company that makes products marketed to women should treat the women it hires with respect. And yes, that includes underwear models.

History books are filled with photos of people we know primarily from their life stories or own writings. To picture them in real life, we must rely on sparse or grainy black-and-white photos and our own imaginations.

Now, thanks to some tech geeks with a dream, we can get a bit closer to seeing what iconic historical figures looked like in real life.

Most of us know Frederick Douglass as the famous abolitionist—a formerly enslaved Black American who wrote extensively about his experiences—but we may not know that he was also the most photographed American in the 19th century. In fact, we have more portraits of Frederick Douglass than we do of Abraham Lincoln.

This plethora of photos was on purpose. Douglass felt that photographs—as opposed to caricatures that were so often drawn of Black people—captured "the essential humanity of its subjects" and might help change how white people saw Black people.

In other words, he used photos to humanize himself and other Black people in white people's eyes.

Imagine what he'd think of the animating technology utilized on myheritage.com that allows us to see what he might have looked like in motion. La Marr Jurelle Bruce, a Black Studies professor at the University of Maryland, shared videos he created using photos of Douglass and the My Heritage Deep Nostalgia technology on Twitter.

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After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

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'Love is a battlefield' indeed. They say you have to kiss ~~at least~~ a few frogs to find your prince and it's inevitable that in seeking long-term romantic satisfaction, slip ups will happen. Whether it's a lack of compatibility, unfortunate circumstances, or straight up bad taste in the desired sex, your first shot at monogamous bliss might not succeed. And that's okay! Those experiences enrich our lives and strengthen our resolve to find love. That's what I tell myself when trying to rationalize my three-month stint with the bassist of a terrible noise rock band.


One woman's viral tweet about a tacky mug wall encouraged people to share stories about second loves. Okay, first things first: Ana Stanowick's mom has a new boyfriend who's basically perfect. All the evidence you need is in the photograph:

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via Saturday Night Live / YouTube

Through 46 seasons, "Saturday Night Live" has had its ups and downs. There were the golden years of '75 to '80 and, of course, the early '90s when everyone in the cast seemed to eventually become a superstar.

Then there were the disastrous '81 and '85 seasons where the show completely lost its identity and was on the brink of cancellation.

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