Victoria's Secret models are asking the company to step up and address its culture of misogyny

Between 2016 and 2018, the market share of Victoria's Secret in the U.S. dropped from 33% to 24%, as the company had received criticism for being behind the times. When it comes to our underwear, we want comfort over sex appeal, and when it comes to businesses, we want them to be harassment-free. The New York Times recently published a piece detailing a culture of "misogyny, bullying and harassment" at Victoria's Secret.

"This abuse was just laughed off and accepted as normal. It was almost like brainwashing. And anyone who tried to do anything about it wasn't just ignored. They were punished," Casey Crowe Taylor, a former public relations employee at Victoria's Secret, told the Times.


The allegations weren't much of a surprise. L Brands CEO Leslie Wexner had been tied to Jeffrey Epstein, and chief marketing officer Ed Razek stepped down last year following transphobic and fatphobic comments. Five months ago, the Model Collective (an organization that advocates for the protection of models) met with L Brands/Victoria's Secret, asking the company to "take concrete action to change its culture of misogyny and abuse."

RELATED: Victoria's Secret model Karlie Kloss says she quit modeling after studying feminist theory

It did not, and the Model Alliance sent the company an open letter after the New York Times piece came out, calling out the bad behavior at Victoria's Secret. "The time for listening is long past; it's time for Victoria's Secret to take action to protect the people they profit from," the letter reads. "Human rights violations can't be stopped with a corporate rebranding exercise."

"The Model Alliance believes in safety, freedom to work without fear of harassment, and real consequences for abusers. Victoria's Secret's failure to create an environment of accountability, both in-house and in their interactions with a network of agencies and creatives, undermines these values. We envision an industry in which creative expression flourishes and everyone can work without fear of harassment or abuse," the letter continues.

The letter also outlines details of the RESPECT Program, a Model Alliance that is, according to the letter, the "only existing accountability program designed by and for models." Some of the proposed changes include requiring employees and photographers to follow a code of conduct.

The letter has been signed by over 100 models, including some of the biggest names in the industry. Christy Turlington Burns, Amber Valletta, Edie Campbell, and Amanda de Cadenet have all signed the letter.

RELATED: Target's new swimwear line features a diverse group of models, proving all bodies are beautiful

L Brands responded to the letter, saying they're on the same page. "We absolutely share a common goal with Model Alliance to ensure the safety and wellbeing of models. Our robust Photo Shoot Procedures, including training and oversight, were implemented in May 2019 and reflect elements of the RESPECT Program and beyond. We're proud of the progress we've made and remain committed to continuous improvement. We're always open to engage with those looking to make improvements in the industry," L Brands said in a statement.

Actions speak louder than words, and the only way Victoria's Secret can be better is by doing better. A company that makes products marketed to women should treat the women it hires with respect. And yes, that includes underwear models.

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Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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Joy

Meet Eva, the hero dog who risked her life saving her owner from a mountain lion

Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva when a mountain lion suddenly appeared.

Photo by Didssph on Unsplash

A sweet face and fierce loyalty: Belgian Malinois defends owner.

The Belgian Malinois is a special breed of dog. It's highly intelligent, extremely athletic and needs a ton of interaction. While these attributes make the Belgian Malinois the perfect dog for police and military work, they can be a bit of a handful as a typical pet.

As Belgian Malinois owner Erin Wilson jokingly told NPR, they’re basically "a German shepherd on steroids or crack or cocaine.”

It was her Malinois Eva’s natural drive, however, that ended up saving Wilson’s life.

According to a news release from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva slightly ahead of her when a mountain lion suddenly appeared and swiped Wilson across the left shoulder. She quickly yelled Eva’s name and the dog’s instincts kicked in immediately. Eva rushed in to defend her owner.

It wasn’t long, though, before the mountain lion won the upper hand, much to Wilson’s horror.

She told TODAY, “They fought for a couple seconds, and then I heard her start crying. That’s when the cat latched on to her skull.”

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TikTok about '80s childhood is a total Gen X flashback.

As a Gen X parent, it's weird to try to describe my childhood to my kids. We're the generation that didn't grow up with the internet or cell phones, yet are raising kids who have never known a world without them. That difference alone is enough to make our 1980s childhoods feel like a completely different planet, but there are other differences too that often get overlooked.

How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

And '80s hair? With the feathered bangs and the terrible perms and the crunchy hair spray? What, why and how?

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