Target's new swimwear line features a diverse group of models, proving all bodies are beautiful

It's sounds weird, but having models who look like the women who buy swimsuits can actually help sell swimsuits? Target has been the number one market share holder in women's swimwear since 2015, and it's hard not to feel that their commitment to inclusive models gets part of the credit.

Target just launched their Swim 2020 campaign, and the models for the retailer's line come in all sizes and races, just like the women who are actually buying them. This year, Target even cast a model with Ichthyosis, a hereditary skin condition that causes the body to shed its skin every two weeks. The condition creates rough, dryer skin on the surface of the body, giving it an appearance like scales.



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According to the American Academy of Dermatology, one in four Americans have been impacted with a skin disease since 2013. By casting Jeyza Gary, the model with Ichthyosis, Target is sending a message that bodies with skin conditions are also bikini bodies.

Gary went into modeling because after a friend encouraged her. Gary had never seen a model with her skin condition, and her decision to embrace who she is inspired others. "I posted one of the pictures to my Instagram, and one woman reached out in my DMs. She said, 'Your pictures give me goosebumps. I have lamellar ichthyosis, but I don't have the courage to wear shorts. You give me the courage to do something I've never done,'" Gary told Refinery 29. "It's not about me. It's about allowing other people to see me and be encouraged." Target's swimwear line is her first campaign.


Target's swimwear collection of 1,800+ new pieces doesn't leave curvier women out of cute fashion. Top sizes go up to 26 and 38DDD. 68% of women in America wear a size 14 or higher, yet they're often left out by clothing manufacturers. Women shouldn't feel left out just because their body isn't what we're traditionally used to seeing in advertisements.

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This isn't the first time Target has launched a marketing campaign with a message of body positivity and inclusivity. Target used model Kiara Washington, who has a prosthetic leg, in a previous marketing campaign for their size-inclusive swimwear line Kona Sol. Earlier this year, Target launched a size-inclusive athletic wear line with sizes ranging from XS to 4X.

It's great that more major brands are realizing that representation isn't "one size fits all," and are changing their advertisements to reflect that. On top of it all, the new swimsuits look pretty darn cute.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

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Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

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A man who uses a wheelchair fell onto the tracks in a New York City subway station on Wednesday afternoon. A CBS New York writer was at the scene of the incident and says that people rushed to save the man after they heard him "whimpering."

It's unclear why the man fell onto the tracks.

A brave rescuer risked his life by jumping on the tracks to get the man to safety knowing that the train would come barreling in at any second. The footage is even more dramatic because you can hear the station's PA system announce that the train is on its way.

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