Here are all the times Trump said his healthcare plan was 'coming very soon' since 2017

Since he first ran for the presidency, Donald Trump has been on a mission to destroy the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare. Whether he attacks the plan that made health insurance available to more than 20 million Americans because he genuinely understands it and doesn't like it or because it's something that Obama did is unclear, but either way, getting rid of it has been on his agenda for four years.

(Now might be a good time to remind people that the bones of the Affordable Care Act were built by Republican Mitt Romney, whose Massachusetts healthcare reform during his time as Governor served as a model for Obamacare.)

Trump's promises to take down Obamacare have been accompanied by promises to replace it with something better. After all, if you take away a healthcare law that protects people with pre-existing conditions and makes health insurance available to millions who couldn't afford it, you have to put something in its place or you literally put people's lives at risk.

The president appears to know this, because he keeps saying he's got a healthcare plan coming. The best healthcare. The most tremendous healthcare. Fantastic. Terrific. A big, beautiful plan the likes of which the world has never seen before. And it's coming soon. Very soon. So very soon. Within two weeks, he's said several different times, many months apart.

Biden pointed out at last night's debate that Trump has no plan for healthcare, and Trump again repeated what he's been saying since at least January 2017. The Lincoln Project compiled these claims in one video, and even though we've heard them before, it's striking to see almost four years of promises condensed into a minute and fifteen seconds.



How long can a president say something is coming "very soon" and not make it happen? Apparently, an entire presidential term. Neato.

What's extra odd is that this mystery healthcare plan is also being peddled by spokespeople in his administration, with some rather hilarious optics to go along with it. Trump's press secretary Kayleigh McEnany handed 60 Minutes journalist Leslie Stahl a staggeringly thick hardcover book, and a photo shared by the president himself showed Stahl opening it to an empty page. Jokes ensued about the entire book being blank, and since America hasn't been given the opportunity to see it, nobody really knows what's in it.

We do, however, have Trump's September 24 "Executive Order on an America-First Healthcare Plan." In it he dedicated nearly 3600 words to things his administration has done regarding healthcare (such as eliminating the ACA individual mandate, lowering drug prices, and increasing telehealth accessibility during the pandemic) and less than 500 words outlining his objectives for the future (which can basically be summed up as "make healthcare affordable and provide choice" without any actual plans or policy details for doing that). Apparently, a comprehensive healthcare plan in Trumpland means a piecemeal approach that only gets pulled together in hindsight.

In other words, he still doesn't have a healthcare plan to replace Obamacare. And that's a little bit important since the Supreme Court will be ruling on the constitutionality of the ACA on November 10.

But don't worry, I'm sure that plan be coming very, very, very soon.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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The fasting period of Ramadan observed by Muslims around the world is a both an individual and communal observance. For the individual, it's a time to grow closer to God through sacrifice and detachment from physical desires. For the community, it's a time to gather in joy and fellowship at sunset, breaking bread together after abstaining from food and drink since sunrise.

The COVID-19 pandemic has limited group gatherings in many countries, putting a damper on the communal part of Ramadan. But for one community in Barcelona, Spain, a different faith has stepped up to make the after sunset meal, known as Iftar, as safe as possible for the Muslim community.

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Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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