This incredible art project in Paris uses heartbeats to plant trees. Here's how.

The Eiffel Tower knows how to go green and looks great doing it.

Plenty of folks have seen the Eiffel Tower.

Photo via iStock.


And it's certainly a sight to see on any occasion.

But until Sunday night, no one had seen it quite like this...

All GIFs via Here Now/YouTube.

In dazzling fashion, images and graphics were projected onto the tower the day before COP21 began in Paris.

The installation lit up the sky with its forest theme on Nov. 29, 2015, a day ahead of COP21 (that's short for the Conferences of Parties), the United Nations' climate change summit, which runs through Dec. 4.

The project, titled "1 Heart 1 Tree" and created by artist Naziha Mestaoui, is aimed at drawing attention to the conference and encouraging leaders to (wake up and) set ambitious goals to reduce carbon emissions.

Photo courtesy of 1 Heart 1 Tree, used with permission.

The best part? You can be part of Mestaoui's creation.

By downloading an app and using its sensor to monitor your heartbeat, the pumping of your heart will create a growing "branch" on the tower's tree. (How freaking cool is that?!) You can view it in the app on your phone and share with friends on social media.

But that's not all. Through the project's partnered reforestation programs, app users also purchase an actual tree to be planted when they buy a virtual one for the tower. So far, the app has ensured about 50,000 trees will be planted because of "1 Heart 1 Tree."

"I created this installation so that people everywhere can realize what is possible if we come together," Mestaoui said in a speech on Sunday, according to a press release provided to Upworthy.

"We can protect and regrow our forests, we can tap the natural powers of the sun, the wind, the earth and the sea, and we can build a safer future if we go 100% clean energy for everyone."

COP21 is a truly historic event — one that could actually spark a major shift in the fight against climate change.

Leaders from more than 150 countries around the world have gathered in Paris to nail down the specifics as to how each can do its fair share to cut way back on carbon emissions.

It's the largest gathering of heads of state — ever.


The end goal is to reduce the world's collective carbon footprint to ensure global temperatures don't exceed 2 degrees Celsius of what they were before the industrial revolution of the late-1700s. Because, as climate science tells us, that would be absolutely awful.

The conference is just starting but, so far, news out of the summit seems promising.

For starters, take the summit's guest list — (practically) the whole world is seriously committed to fighting climate change. That includes major polluters, like the U.S., India, China, and Russia.


Also, news of Bill Gates' multibillion-dollar initiative to unite the world with clean energy investments is already making waves as a game-changing strategy to make our energy sources greener while also helping eradicate poverty in the developing world.

Basically, it's a huge win-win.

"1 Heart 1 Tree" serves as a powerful reminder that the beauty of art can have an immeasurable impact.

Lighting up The Eiffel Tower won't stop climate change on its own — but it can inspire the hearts and minds of those who are dedicated to trying their best.

Check out incredible footage of "1 Heart 1 Tree" below:

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