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This Epic Response To 'Fat People Can't Be Sexy' Is Totally Unexpected But So On Point

Let's all hope Hart's dance break finally puts this "Fat people can't be sexy" myth right to bed.

This Epic Response To 'Fat People Can't Be Sexy' Is Totally Unexpected But So On Point

It all started when Hart received the following message on Tumblr:


Instead of getting angry or taking offense, Hart took a big gulp of tea and decided to answer like any level-headed adult...

...with a sexy dance break.


Followed by a perfect takedown of this ridiculous question.

And just for good measure, here's Hart's response in all its glory:

"You know, it really sucks that we live in a society that has this misinterpretation that being heavyset is an ugly and shameful thing to be. Well, person, they didn't choose the sexy. The sexy chose them." — Hartbeat

Check out the full video below, which includes Hart's epic dance break from 0:24-0:58. And just as a heads-up, while there's no nudity, your boss might not be cool with you watching sexy dancing while you're supposed to be working. So ... you've been forewarned.

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Photo by Phillip Goldsberry on Unsplash

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