This collection of all-too-real mom memes hilariously captures the reality of motherhood.

Is there any better fodder for humor than motherhood? Nope.

One of the perks of having kids is getting to join the Mom Solidarity Club, where all we do is laugh maniacally in the face of sleep deprivation, diaper blowouts, and kids building booger forests on their bedroom walls.

Your toddler asked for the blue cup and then cried because you gave him the blue cup? HA!


Your kid can't seem to find the trash can that sits six inches from where they always leave their wrappers on the counter? HAHA!

You got woken up by a hungry baby at 1:00am, by a kid with a nightmare at 2:30am, and then by another kid at 3:45am because they wet the bed? BWAAHAAHA! WAAAAAAAAHHAAAHAAAA!

(There's a fine line between laughing and crying as a mom. You learn to roll with it.)

These mom memes have been shared more than 175,000 times because they are just. too. real.

Emma Bea shared a perfectly curated collection of mom memes on Facebook, and moms are sharing them left and right. There are loads of memes out there, of course, but rarely do we see so many that so perfectly capture the reality of motherhood all in one place.

For example, the universal truth that having kids means you'll won't be able to pee in peace for years.

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

Or how you feel—and look—like you've been through battle at the end of a full day of parenting.

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

How about when you decide you're a hairdresser because even though you have no hair cutting training, you also have no money?

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

Oh, you want to have a lengthy, meaningful phone conversation? Gonna have to wait til graduation, Janice.

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

But seriously, who invented onesies for squirrelly toddlers? BEND THE KNEE. No, the ANKLE. No, the OTHER WAY.  GAAHHHH.

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

That toddler blue cup thing I mentioned? Oh, it's real.

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

Uncanny, right? It's like someone has put a secret camera in our homes and captured all of our daily parenting challenges.

Oh, and there's more.

Awwww, baby fell asleep on your chest? Now you're stuck there for two hours unless you have the smooth dexterity of a bomb technician and the stealth powers of a ninja.

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

And after the five dozenth meal our kids refuse to eat, don't we all turn into The Beast?

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

They won't eat their food. They never seem to hear you when you call them. But as soon as you start to open a candy wrapper anywhere in the house, they suddenly have bionic hearing and insatiable appetites.

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

Me, on the car ride home: "STAY AWAKE, KIDDO! NO, DON'T FALL ASLEEP!!! LA LA LA LA LA!!!" *Rolls down all the car windows.* *Throws things into backseat.* *Squirts kid in face with water bottle.*

Kiddo: ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ.

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

Sometimes there might be just a teensy bit of petty in our parenting game. It's called karma, kiddo.  

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

What? I have no idea what happened to your super annoying, make-me-want-to-poke-my-ears-out toys, darling.

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

Let's talk about how things that were so simple before kids suddenly became colossal feats after kids.

Like, say, leaving the house alone. Never underestimate the glorious liberation of a mother going to the store without her children. It's practically a spiritual experience.

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

Same goes for the elusive shower where no children come knocking on the door because they want a snack or their brother pushed them or they need to poop.  

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

Before you have kids, holding someone's hand was such a basic concept. Like, why is this so hard?

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

Or, you know, sleep. One of the most fundamental human needs, which you will never ever take for granted again.

Shared via Emma Bea. Creator unknown.

And for those who suggest that you get more sleep by cosleeping? Yeah. Been there done that.

Wasn't that good fun? Thank goodness for mom humor. On some days, it's the truly only thing that keeps us from losing our everlovin' minds.

True

When Sue Hoppin was in college, she met the man she was going to marry. "I was attending the University of Denver, and he was at the Air Force Academy," she says. "My dad had also attended the University of Denver and warned me not to date those flyboys from the Springs."

"He didn't say anything about marrying one of them," she says. And so began her life as a military spouse.

The life brings some real advantages, like opportunities to live abroad — her family got to live all around the US, Japan, and Germany — but it also comes with some downsides, like having to put your spouse's career over your own goals.

"Though we choose to marry someone in the military, we had career goals before we got married, and those didn't just disappear."

Career aspirations become more difficult to achieve, and progress comes with lots of starts and stops. After experiencing these unique challenges firsthand, Sue founded an organization to help other military spouses in similar situations.

Sue had gotten a degree in international relations because she wanted to pursue a career in diplomacy, but for fourteen years she wasn't able to make any headway — not until they moved back to the DC area. "Eighteen months later, many rejections later, it became apparent that this was going to be more challenging than I could ever imagine," she says.

Eighteen months is halfway through a typical assignment, and by then, most spouses are looking for their next assignment. "If I couldn't find a job in my own 'hometown' with multiple degrees and a great network, this didn't bode well for other military spouses," she says.

She's not wrong. Military spouses spend most of their lives moving with their partners, which means they're often far from family and other support networks. When they do find a job, they often make less than their civilian counterparts — and they're more likely to experience underemployment or unemployment. In fact, on some deployments, spouses are not even allowed to work.

Before the pandemic, military spouse unemployment was 22%. Since the pandemic, it's expected to rise to 35%.

Sue eventually found a job working at a military-focused nonprofit, and it helped her get the experience she needed to create her own dedicated military spouse program. She wrote a book and started saving up enough money to start the National Military Spouse Network (NMSN), which she founded in 2010 as the first organization of its kind.

"I founded the NMSN to help professional military spouses develop flexible careers they could perform from any location."

"Over the years, the program has expanded to include a free digital magazine, professional development events, drafting annual White Papers and organizing national and local advocacy to address the issues of most concern to the professional military spouse community," she says.

Not only was NMSN's mission important to Sue on a personal level she also saw it as part of something bigger than herself.

"Gone are the days when families can thrive on one salary. Like everyone else, most military families rely on two salaries to make ends meet. If a military spouse wants or needs to work, they should be able to," she says.

"When less than one percent of our population serves in the military," she continues, "we need to be able to not only recruit the best and the brightest but also retain them."

"We lose out as a nation when service members leave the force because their spouse is unable to find employment. We see it as a national security issue."

"The NMSN team has worked tirelessly to jumpstart the discussion and keep the challenges affecting military spouses top of mind. We have elevated the conversation to Congress and the White House," she continues. "I'm so proud of the fact that corporations, the government, and the general public are increasingly interested in the issues affecting military spouses and recognizing the employment roadblocks they unfairly have faced."

"We have collectively made other people care, and in doing so, we elevated the issues of military spouse unemployment to a national and global level," she adds. "In the process, we've also empowered military spouses to advocate for themselves and our community so that military spouse employment issues can continue to remain at the forefront."

Not only has NMSN become a sought-after leader in the military spouse employment space, but Sue has also seen the career she dreamed of materializing for herself. She was recently invited to participate in the public re-launch of Joining Forces, a White House initiative supporting military and veteran families, with First Lady Dr. Jill Biden.

She has also had two of her recommendations for practical solutions introduced into legislation just this year. She was the first in the Air Force community to show leadership the power of social media to reach both their airmen and their military families.

That is why Sue is one of Tory Burch's "Empowered Women" this year. The $5,000 donation will be going to The Madeira School, a school that Sue herself attended when she was in high school because, she says, "the lessons I learned there as a student pretty much set the tone for my personal and professional life. It's so meaningful to know that the donation will go towards making a Madeira education more accessible to those who may not otherwise be able to afford it and providing them with a life-changing opportunity."

Most military children will move one to three times during high school so having a continuous four-year experience at one high school can be an important gift. After traveling for much of her formative years, Sue attended Madeira and found herself "in an environment that fostered confidence and empowerment. As young women, we were expected to have a voice and advocate not just for ourselves, but for those around us."

To learn more about Tory Burch and Upworthy's Empowered Women program visit https://www.toryburch.com/empoweredwomen/. Nominate an inspiring woman in your community today!

via Pixabay

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