These moms are flaunting their stunning postpartum bodies on Instagram.

Meg Boggs is on a body confidence mission to change the way we look at postpartum bodies.

As part of her mission, the mom blogger recently recruited 25 moms to share their own journeys and struggles with body confidence, postpartum depression and anxiety as well as infant loss and grief. She had them share photos and details about their story, using the hashtag #this_is_postpartum on Instagram. The collection of images is stunning to say the least.


Every woman’s story is inspiring in its own unique way.

One mother, Ashley Dorough, of houseofdorough.com, posted about the postpartum depression she suffered from after the birth of her second child. “Hey, you. I know what it feels like to look in the mirror and feel disgusted, worthless, broken.”

View this post on Instagram

#this_is_postpartum Hey, you. I know what it feels like to look in the mirror and feel disgusted, worthless, broken. To cry for no reason. To feel too proud to ask for help. To have unexplainable feelings of hopelessness, anger, and resentment. To have all of your expectations of what you think motherhood is going to be like ripped apart. All of these experiences we go through... they DO make us stronger. But why doesn’t it feel that way? Why isn’t it celebrated? Why can’t we glamorize ALL body types and all seasons of life? What is this insane pressure we feel to make everything perfect? I grew up with no one in the media who looked like me, in a society where no one talks openly about depression and anxiety. Today, I’m sharing this for the teenage girl who punishes herself with diets and exercise because she doesn’t look like what she sees on TV. Today, I share this for the mama who is putting so much pressure on herself to “snap back” to her pre-baby weight. I’m sharing this for the plus size women, mamas and mama’s to be who have always been greatly underrepresented in the media. And for the person who thinks they might need help but is afraid to admit it... this is for you. I’ve been you, and I’m here to tell you it’s okay. I’m sharing this for YOU, no matter your gender, size, shape, or race. The good, the bad, the ugly... this is us. This is about finding the beauty in everything around you, your children, your life, and the journey. Getting the help you need even if you don’t think you do. I’m here for you. We’re all here for you. You. Are. Enough. This is postpartum, and so is this: @sidelinesocialite

A post shared by Ashley Dorough (@ashley_dorough) on

“To cry for no reason. To feel too proud to ask for help. To have unexplainable feelings of hopelessness, anger, and resentment. To have all of your expectations of what you think motherhood is going to be like ripped apart. All of these experiences we go through... they DO make us stronger. But why doesn’t it feel that way? Why isn’t it celebrated?”

Desiree Fortin, who struggled with infertility, chose to use the platform as a method to embrace her postpartum body after welcoming triplets,” she told CNN. "My body changed more than I anticipated. There was a lot of extra skin, there were stretch marks covering all over.” She now refers to them as her “hope wounds” as they represent things she had “prayed and longed for.”

View this post on Instagram

Incase you don’t know, here are some Fun Facts about my Pregnancy/Delivery: • 1. I made it to our goal date: 34 weeks + 1 Day 2. I was obsessed with @fiveguys hamburgers my entire pregnancy and now I can’t stand the thought of eating there. 3. I was on strict bed rest for two months and binge watched @greysabc 4. I measured 52 weeks pregnant 5. Our gender reveal video went viral. We told all our loved ones we were having twins and surprises them with the 3rd baby at the reveal🙌🏻💕 6. The birth order: Charlize, Sawyer, and Jax 7. I had a c-section and there was about 20 people in my room. Each baby and myself had a team of doctors and nurses. 8. I had a mole removed from my ass after the c-section 🙈🤦🏻‍♀️😂😳 yep, really fun fact for ya🤷‍♀️🤷‍♀️😂 9. (More of a fact than fun fact😭) I hemorrhaged after my c-section when I was in recovery with my mom. I had blood transfusions and almost died. My doctor saved my life💕 10. I didn’t get to meet the babies until a full day after their birth. 11. I was obsessed with the diabetic hospital jello 😂 12. The triplets were in the NICU for 2 weeks. 13. Charlize was the first baby I held. 14. My doctor told me that I likely wouldn’t be able to breastfeed because of my birth complications, but I produced enough milk for the triplets plus! 15. I’m taking over @super_pregnant007 today to share my heart and journey to Motherhood!! Head over to @super_pregnant007 to follow along!! • AND Comment below ⬇️⬇️⬇️ with a fun fact about your pregnancy or delivery 💕

A post shared by Desiree Fortin (@theperfectmom) on

"They are the road map to my motherhood. They are a representation of my three miracle babies who I would not have if I did not walk through infertility and carry three human beings at one time.”

Other stories document miscarriage, and the shame and feelings of failure that women can struggle with after c-section scarring and general body image struggles. Each is distinctive, beautiful and truly moving.

Boggs’ personal struggles with motherhood inspired her to start the movement.

Her body confidence struggles began during pregnancy, when Boggs, a plus size woman, noticed that her body didn’t look like other expectant moms. "I would see pictures of a perfect bump and I didn't relate to that because I definitely did not have a perfect bump," she told CNN. Despite internet searches, she had trouble finding images of women who looked like her. "I felt as if my postpartum journey and body didn't count."

After she had her baby girl, she refused to be photographed with her daughter. "I regret so much that I wasn't in the photos with her. It's so important and you have to think about your kids and they are going to want you in the photos with them," she told CNN.

At seven months postpartum, she was inspired to start her blog, MegBoggs.com. While she expected to be shamed and trolled by readers, she was pleasantly surprised with all the support she received. "To my surprise, my messages flooded with positivity and things like 'I needed this today.' That's when this idea started finding its way into my heart," she explained.

View this post on Instagram

Being thin is okay. Not being thin is okay. Having curves is okay. Not having curves is okay. Having stretch marks is okay. Not having stretch marks is okay. Having scars is okay. Not having scars is okay. Having cellulite is okay. Not having cellulite is okay. It’s not your job to look like what you see on the big screen, or in the media. It’s not your job to look perfect. Or put together. Or effortlessly happy. It’s not your job to look like anyone or anything else but YOU. And it’s OKAY. But do you know what’s never okay? Shaming another for not fitting the mold of a societal “perfection”. Shaming another for their body type. Or the clothes that they wear (or don’t wear). Or the marks left on their body during different walks of life. So here’s to measuring ourselves in smiles and feelings of contentment rather than inches and pounds. And here’s to friends that see you for all the loveliness that you are. 💗 you @th3littlestavenger

A post shared by Meg Boggs (@meg.boggs) on

Boggs and these 25 brave and beautiful women hope that their message will help normalize the postpartum experience for others who may feel alone.

"I can get hundreds of negative comments but it's that one message that I'll get, even if it's just the one that says 'This is what I needed to see today,' it's those messages that remind me that it's worth it," Boggs said.

This new campaign is a great reminder for women to celebrate their personal journey into motherhood, no matter what it looks like. Bringing a life into this world is one of the most beautiful gifts, and the bodies that help do it should be treated with nothing but love and respect no matter what.

True
Frito-Lay

Did you know one in five families are unable to provide everyday essentials and food for their children? This summer was also the hungriest on record with one in four children not knowing where their next meal will come from – an increase from one in seven children prior to the pandemic. The effects of COVID-19 continue to be felt around the country and many people struggle to secure basic needs. Unemployment is at an all-time high and an alarming number of families face food insecurity, not only from the increased financial burdens but also because many students and families rely on schools for school meal programs and other daily essentials.

This school year is unlike any other. Frito-Lay knew the critical need to ensure children have enough food and resources to succeed. The company quickly pivoted to expand its partnership with Feed the Children, a leading nonprofit focused on alleviating childhood hunger, to create the "Building the Future Together" program to provide shelf-stable food to supplement more than a quarter-million meals and distribute 500,000 pantry staples, school supplies, snacks, books, hand sanitizer, and personal care items to schools in underserved communities.

Keep Reading Show less
via Paul Friedman / Twitter

The best way to honor Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is to share her legacy with the next generation. The feminist icon may have passed away last week at the age of 87, but she lives on in the hearts and minds of multiple generations of Americans, especially women.

In the 1970s, the young Ginsburg "convinced the entire nation, through [her arguments at the] Supreme Court, to... adopt the view of gender equality where equal means the same -- not special accommodations for either gender," Abbe Gluck, a Yale Law School professor and former clerk of Justice Ginsburg, told ABC News.

Keep Reading Show less
True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn’t have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women’s rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

Then there are those of us in the messy middle. Those who believe that life begins at conception, that abortion isn’t something we’d choose—and we’d hope others wouldn’t choose—under most circumstances, yet who choose to vote to keep abortion legal.

Keep Reading Show less
Canva

I got married and started working in my early 20s, and for more than two decades I always had employer-provided health insurance. When the Affordable Care Act (ACA, aka "Obamacare")was passed, I didn't give it a whole lot of thought. I was glad it helped others, but I just assumed my husband or I would always be employed and wouldn't need it.

Then, last summer, we found ourselves in an unexpected scenario. I was working as a freelance writer with regular contract work and my husband left his job to manage our short-term rentals and do part-time contracting work. We both had incomes, but for the first time, no employer-provided insurance. His previous employer offered COBRA coverage, of course, but it was crazy expensive. It made far more sense to go straight to the ACA Marketplace, since that's what we'd have done once COBRA ran out anyway.

The process of getting our ACA healthcare plan set up was a nightmare, but I'm so very thankful for it.

Let me start by saying I live in a state that is friendly to the ACA and that adopted and implemented the Medicaid expansion. I am also a college-educated and a native English speaker with plenty of adult paperwork experience. But the process of getting set up on my state's marketplace was the most confusing, frustrating experience I've ever had signing up for anything, ever.

Keep Reading Show less