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The viral campaign to send girls to see 'Wonder Woman' will warm your heart.

Representation matters, and this group is bridging that gap.

The viral campaign to send girls to see 'Wonder Woman' will warm your heart.

All GIFs from "Wonder Woman"/Warner Bros./YouTube.

The new "Wonder Woman" movie isn't just good, it's important.

That's why the Legion of Women Writers started a GoFundMe campaign to send 70 high-school-aged girls from Girls Inc. in New York to see the movie.


It's "important for young girls to get to experience seeing a woman as the hero on the big screen," the group's three co-founders, Char Martinetti, Carly Lane, and Swapna Krishna, wrote in an e-mail.

They chose to support Girls Inc. because of the group's own commitment to showing girls what they're capable of. "Since Legion of Women Writers is all about women supporting women and representation and inclusion in media, it made perfect sense," they wrote.

With a few days to spare, the crowdfunding effort has been a huge success, surpassing the group's original goal. All funds raised beyond the cost of the movie tickets will go to Girls Inc. directly, which is cool because Girls Inc. does some truly great work for girls and young women.

This is just the latest in an emerging trend of crowdfunding the cost of movie tickets for underrepresented groups.

Earlier this year, multiple crowdfunding campaigns helped send girls to see the Academy Award-winning "Hidden Figures." And in February, Chance the Rapper liked Jordan Peele's "Get Out" so much that he bought out an entire theater on Chicago's South Side for the local community to see.

Legion of Women Writers has already committed to holding another fundraiser to send young black kids to see "Black Panther" when it hits theaters in 2018.

For women, people of color, LGBTQ folks, and others, it's still rare to see real representation in pop culture. Audiences are clearly interested in seeing themselves represented on screen — the success of "Hidden Figures," "Get Out," and "Wonder Woman" are proof of that.

In Hollywood, nothing talks louder than money, and these fundraising campaigns are a great way to make sure studios recognize that audiences want more films like these while also making sure that the people who so desperately need to see themselves reflected in media can do so — regardless of how much a ticket costs.

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


Strangers helping out strangers is always a heartwarming thing. But when lots and lots of strangers come together to help one individual who needs and deserves a little hand up, we get a much-needed flood of warm, gushy best-of-humanity feelings.

Such is the case of an 89-year-old pizza delivery man, Derlin Newey, who happened to win the hearts of the Valdez family after he delivered them a pizza and struck up a conversation. Newey had no idea his friendly demeanor and obviously stellar work ethic would soon make him a TikTok star, nor did he expect an outpouring of donations from perfect strangers that relieve some of his burden.

Carlos Valdez shared the initial pizza delivery video, taken through the family's Nest doorbell, on TikTok about a week ago. "Hello, are you looking for some pizza?" Newey says when they answer the door, then chats with them for a while.


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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


via msleja / TikTok

In 2019, the Washoe County School District in Reno, Nevada instituted a policy that forbids teachers from participating in "partisan political activities" during school hours. The policy states that "any signage that is displayed on District property that is, or becomes, political in nature must be removed or covered."

The new policy is based on the U.S. Supreme Court's 2018 Janus decision that limits public employees' First Amendment protections for speech while performing their official duties.

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Working parents have always had the challenge of juggling career and kids. But during the pandemic, that juggling act feels like a full-on, three-ring circus performance, complete with clowns and rings of fire and flying elephants.

With millions of kids doing virtual learning, our routines and home lives have taken a dramatic shift. Some parents are trying to navigate working from home at the same time, some are trying to figure out who's going to watch over their kids while they work outside the home, and some are scrambling to find a new job because theirs got eliminated due to the pandemic. In addition to the logistical challenges, parents also have to deal with the emotional ups and downs of their kids, who are also dealing with an uncertain and altered reality, while also managing their own existential dread.

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