This heartbreaking new video shows the real effects of whitewashing.

'Movies aren't real, but they affect real people.'

On screen representation — or a lack thereof — has consequences. And when people of color can't see themselves in the media because their stories have been given to white people to tell, it takes its toll in real ways.

It works the same for any marginalized group, like LGBTQ people, people living with disabilities, or people from certain religions.

This phenomenon, known as "whitewashing," is illustrated perfectly in a new gut-wrenching video by New York-based comedians Chewy May and Jes Tom. In the PSA, viewers see why the decision to cast actor Scarlett Johansson, who is white, as the lead in "Ghost in the Shell" — a film based on Japanese anime — perfectly exemplifies how whitewashing can be so harmful by putting a face to the people it hurts.

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Barely three months after Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, allowing for the relocation of anyone on the West Coast deemed a threat to national security.

Soon, nearly 100,000 people of Japanese ancestry (many born in America and half of them children) were assigned identification numbers and loaded into buses, trains, and cars with just a few of their belongings. After a brief stay at temporary encampments, they were moved to 10 permanent, but quickly constructed, relocation centers — better known as internment camps.

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A mini history lesson about the concentration camps on American soil.

74 years ago, a U.S. president ordered an entire ethnic group to be placed in concentration camps on U.S. soil.

During World War II, a young boy was forced from his home with his family, placed on a cramped train, and sent to an isolated camp across the country with no knowledge of when he would be able to return home. He and his family were confined to camps for years, solely on the basis of their ethnicity.

This isn’t the story of an inhumane atrocity that happened across an ocean or in another country. It happened on U.S. soil in 1942.

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