via Evergreen Hospice Volunteers / Facebook

Hospice nurses seem to come from the heavens. It's a job that requires a big heart, the strength to deal with death on a daily basis, and in-depth medical and nursing training.

Five years ago, Leigh Gardner performed a small miracle for a man that made one of his last days on Earth one of his best

Edward Reis, 62, was an ex-forest ranger with multiple sclerosis and had been in hospice care for years. His caregivers became a surrogate family for Reis who didn't have much family in the area.

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On April 18, five women graduated from New York City’s Fire Academy.

This brings the number of women serving in the Fire Department of New York to 72, the highest in its history.

The FDNY’s 2018 graduating class also includes the first son to follow his mother into the profession. She was one of the 41 women hired in 1982 after the department lost a gender discrimination lawsuit and was ordered to add qualified women to the force.

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Think seeing traumatic events doesn't faze first responders? Think again.

Stress can be deadly, even to the strongest individuals. That's why they're learning to talk about it.

"I'm good to go" is a phrase that Marines and first responders like Mike Washington are usually all too familiar with.

It's often the knee-jerk response to the call of duty, even if emotionally they're anything but "good."

"As firefighters, as law enforcement, as military, we try to play that tough image," explains Washington, a firefighter for the Seattle Fire Department. "And we wouldn’t share if we’re having a hard time dealing with something. We internalize it."

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Starbucks Upstanders Season 2

The incredible story of how police and firefighters stepped in as subs after a tragedy.

This is a beautiful example of a community coming together to help each other in times of need.

In late August 2016, a beloved fifth-grade teacher passed away suddenly in Greenwood, Arkansas.

Jennifer Nelms taught at East Hills Middle School. "She just ... took whatever she was thrown and just spun it positively," Karen Benjamin, a teacher who worked in the same classroom as Nelms, told KFSM Channel 5.

Her coworkers say the young teacher had been diagnosed with lupus a couple of years ago, but her death from complications associated with the disease was unexpected. Benjamin said Nelms went home for the weekend not feeling well, thinking all she needed was a little rest. But she died the following day, leaving behind a husband and two sons.

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