'It's a miracle': Cat that a family thought they cremated turns back up at their home

Frankie, a 16-year-old tabby cat in Cheshire, England, didn't come home on May 19 and his family was devastated. Rachel Fitzsimons, her husband John, and their children Thea, 10, and Remy 7, launched a search party to find their missing pet.

The news was especially distressing to young Remy who slept with Frankie every night. "He cried and cried," Rachel told Manchester Evening News.

A few days later, the family was driving on the highway near their home and saw a dead cat on the side of the road that appeared to be Frankie. The cat was badly mangled and they didn't want to get too close a look, in case the decapitated feline was their beloved pet.


Rachel reached out to local authorities to pick up the cat's remains.

"We called the Highways agency who were very helpful and went out several times to look for the body. I gave them a description of Frankie; a fluffy tabby with a white tummy, and the dead cat matched that," Rachel said.

The Highways England staff said the cat matched the markings described by Rachel. They collected what was left of the cat and handed it over in a box to the family. They didn't look at the cat because it was in such terrible shape.

The family decided to have the cat cremated and when its ashes were returned, Remy slept with them in his bed for a few days. "We were all in tears for days afterwards," Rachel said.

On June 10, three weeks after Frankie went missing, John heard a familiar meow at the door.

''My husband heard a meow outside and then I heard him shouting," Rachel said. We all ran out and there was Frankie! Remy was crying and asking: 'Is he real?' It was an amazing moment."

The family had to have been in complete shock after they had already accepted his death.

"It's a miracle," Remy declared according to the BBC. "We thought he had died."

"He was bedraggled and very thin," Rachel remarked. But after a few good meals and a checkup at the vet, Frankie was his old self again. "We've no idea where he's been but just feel so lucky to have him back," she said.

"My two children are thrilled to have him home, they are making a big fuss of him, and he's back on Remy's bed each night," Rachel said.

Now that all of the sadness has turned to joy, Rachel has found some humor in the story. "We cremated someone else's cat," she said.

If there's a bright side for the poor cat that was hit by a car on the highway and its family, at least its remains were treated with respect. It would be wonderful if somehow they found out that their cat was treated respectfully after meeting such a terrible demise. It would also give them some closure after losing their pet.

That first car is a rite of passage into adulthood. Specifically, the hard-earned lesson of expectations versus reality. Though some of us are blessed with Teslas at 17, most teenagers receive a car that’s been … let’s say previously loved. And that’s probably a good thing, considering nearly half of first-year drivers end up in wrecks. Might as well get the dings on the lemon, right?

Of course, wrecks aside, buying a used car might end up costing more in the long run after needing repairs, breaking down and just a general slew of unexpected surprises. But hey, at least we can all look back and laugh.

My first car, for example, was a hand-me-down Toyota of some sort from my mother. I don’t recall the specific model, but I definitely remember getting into a fender bender within the first week of having it. She had forgotten to get the brakes fixed … isn’t that a fun story?

Jimmy Fallon recently asked his “Tonight Show” audience on Twitter to share their own worst car experiences. Some of them make my brake fiasco look like cakewalk (or cakedrive, in this case). Either way, these responses might make us all feel a little less alone. Or at the very least, give us a chuckle.

Here are 22 responses with the most horsepower:

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Mozart was known for his musical talent at a young age, playing the harpsichord at age 4 and writing original compositions at age 5. So perhaps it's fitting that a video of 5-year-old piano prodigy Alberto Cartuccia Cingolani playing Mozart has gone viral as people marvel at his musical abilities.

Alberto's legs can't even reach the pedals, but that doesn't stop his little hands from flying expertly over the keys as incredible music pours out of the piano at the 10th International Musical Competition "Città di Penne" in Italy. Even if you've seen young musicians play impressively, it's hard not to have your jaw drop at this one. Sometimes a kid comes along who just clearly has a gift.

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Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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