You know about police dogs and guide dogs. But do you know about bee-saving dogs?

This is Klinker. She lives in Maryland, and she looks like your average dog.



Images via National Geographic.

She's not.

Klinker is the only certified dog in the United States that can sniff out a specific bacteria that is killing our bee populations.

I repeat: the only certified dog in the whole United States.

The bacteria is called American foulbrood, and it's responsible for a whole lot of bee damage out there. The USDA calls this bacteria one of the most widespread and most destructive of the honeybee brood diseases. Yikes.

But Klinker is here to save the bees' day (and ours too!). She's been trained to detect it — and she's better at it than any human out there.

"Leave it to me, Mr. Human." — Klinker

Her sniffing skills are in high demand — our bee populations are in rough shape.

Greenpeace reports a 40% loss of all commercial honeybees in the United States in the last 10 years.

That's so many. And that's why it's great that Klinker can inspect up to 1,000 bee colonies a day.

Klinker's ability to detect the disease early on prevents mass destruction of bee colonies. And it saves some serious cash, too.

Usually, when the American foulbrood bacteria is discovered, it's too late to save the bees. The beekeeper often has no choice but to burn the whole colony down (with a sad, sad fire) to keep it from spreading. This is costly. Not to mention pretty sad.

But Klinker can detect the bacteria before that — saving her state of Maryland money and bees at the same time.

At this point, I'm fairly convinced Klinker can do anything. I think I love her. It's serious.

You can see more of how awesome she is in this National Geographic clip.

This pup is efficient, economic, and helping to save an insect we desperately need if we want to to keep living life the way we all do.

Now we just need more dogs like her!

It is safe to say that the wise words of Muhammad Ali stands the test of time. Widely considered to be the greatest heavyweight boxer the world has ever seen, the legacy of Ali extends far beyond his pugilistic endeavors. Throughout his career, he spoke out about racial issues and injustices. The brash Mohammed Ali (or who we once knew as Cassius Clay) was always on point with his charismatic rhetoric— despite being considered arrogant at times. Even so, he had a perspective that was difficult to argue with.

As a massive boxing fan—and a huge Ali fan—I have never seen him more calm and to the point then in this recently posted BBC video from 1971. Although Ali died in 2016, at 74 years old, his courage inside and outside the ring is legendary. In this excerpt, Ali explained to Michael Parkinson about how he used to ask his mother about white representation. Even though the interview is nearly 50 years old, it shows exactly how far we need to come as a country on the issues of racial inclusion and equality.


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