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Women in country music are fighting to be heard. Literally. A study found that between 2000 and 2018, the amount of country songs on the radio by women had fallen by 66%. In 2018, just 11.3% of country songs on the radio were by women. The statistics don't exist in a vacuum. There are misogynistic attitudes behind them. Anyone remember the time radio consultant Keith Hill compared country radio stations to a salad, saying male artists are the lettuce and women are "the tomatoes of our salad"...? Air play of female country artists fell from 19% of songs on the radio to 10.4% of songs on the radio in the three years after he said that.

Not everyone thinks that women are tomatoes. This year's CMA Awards celebrated women, and Sugarland's Jennifer Nettles saw the opportunity to bring awareness to this issue and "inspire conversation about country music's need to play more women artists on radio and play listings," as Nettles put it on her Instagram. She did it in a uniquely feminine way – by making a fashion statement that also made a statement-statement.

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"Crazy Rich Asians" was groundbreaking; not only did the film help resuscitate the rom-com, a genre believed to be dead, but it paved the way for Asian representation in Hollywood. The film opened at No. 1 at the box office and made nearly $238.5 million worldwide, proving that inclusion is also viable. But when it comes to compensating female Asian writers, "Crazy Rich Asians" is business as usual.

The movie's co-writer, Adele Lim, left the franchise after finding out her white male counterpart would make ten times as much as her for the sequel. While Lim didn't specify how much more Peter Chiarelli, her male co-writer, would be making for the film, the Hollywood Reporter stated Chiarelli's starting offer was around $800,000 to $1 million, while Lim's was $110,000-plus.

Quotes are set based on experience, and per the Hollywood Reporter, Warner Bros. didn't want to "set a troubling precedent in the business" by paying Lim more money. Lim had multiple TV credits under her belt, but no feature credits before "Crazy Rich Asians."

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Instagram / Snoop Dogg / USWNT

Studies have shown that men who have daughters are more likely to support women's rights. CEOs with daughter are more aware of the problems women face in the workplace, and a 2011 study of Danish companies found they're more likely to close the gender wage gap.

One man whose daughter has played a role in his championing of women's rights? Snoop Dogg. The rapper posted a video on Instagram highlighting the inequality that the U.S. women's soccer team is currently facing, and he did it in the most endearingly Snoop Dogg way.

"Food for thought: Shout out to the USA women's soccer team for their fourth World Cup, but what I want to talk about is they only get $90,000 per player, but the men, if they win it they get $500,000 per player," he said in the video. "Sorry-ass [expletive] men from the US soccer team ain't ever won [expletive], ain't gonna ever win [expletive], can't even get out of the [expletive] first round."

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When two of the female co-stars of "The Big Bang Theory" stood up for equal pay, their coworkers didn't just mumble the usual supportive platitudes.

Cast members of "The Big Bang Theory." Photo by Mark Davis/Getty Images.

According to a report in Variety, the show's five original cast members each agreed to take a $100,000 per episode pay cut so that Melissa Rauch and Mayim Bialick — who joined the cast in season three — could get a raise.

Rauch (left) and Bialick. Photo by Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images.

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