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This woman sold $20,000 worth of stationery, and it's helping women everywhere.

Your next calendar could do so much more than tell you what day it is.

This woman sold $20,000 worth of stationery, and it's helping women everywhere.
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Facebook #SheMeansBusiness

For Lauren Shuttleworth, the mission of her social enterprise, Words With Heart, is — well — close to her heart.

"I was volunteering at a school in Kenya a couple of years ago and was hugely affected by the number of girls I saw dropping out of school simply because they were unable to afford the school fees," she told Upworthy in an email.

She wanted to find a way to "provide a sustainable funding source to see these women and girls through school." So she came up with Words With Heart, an eco-friendly stationery company that also funds women's and girls education projects.


Image via Words with Heart, used with permission.

Why girls' education?

Image via iStock.

Over 60 million girls across the world are out of school.


Image via iStock.

Two-thirds of the world's illiterate population are women.

Image via iStock.

Just one additional year of school can increase a girl’s earnings by 10% to 20%.

Image via iStock.

And when 10% more girls go to school, a country’s GDP increases by 3%.

Convinced? Lauren's future customers were.

After Lauren came up with the idea for Words With Heart, she set off to start a crowdfunding campaign.

A photo posted by Words With Heart Stationery (@wordswithheart) on

They needed to pre-sell at least $15,000 of stationery to get things off the ground. She started a Facebook page and began sharing videos and posts of Words With Heart's crowdfunding campaign.

After 30 days, due in large part to the connections made through Facebook, Words with Heart had pre-sold $20,000 worth of stationery.

Image via Words with Heart, used with permission.

Lauren has come out on the other end of her enterprise with some great tips for anyone starting their own thing.

1. Reach out for help.

"One of the biggest lessons I've learned is the importance of reaching out and connecting with those that can help your business. Its amazing how much support will come your way if you simply ask for it."

A photo posted by Words With Heart Stationery (@wordswithheart) on


2. Tell your own story.

"I've also learned that being authentic, transparent and telling your personal story goes a long way. ... I quickly realised that on the occasions when I shared a bit of my story on our Facebook page, our sales always went up."

A photo posted by Words With Heart Stationery (@wordswithheart) on


3. Remember your "why."

"When things get hard go back to your WHY. When I make a mistake or something goes wrong (which happens A LOT) I go back to my passion for womens' and girls' education. I'll read the stories from our charity partners and remember the reason why I started the business and what its really all about for me."

In love with with this image from our incredible charity partner @onegirlorg. They're currently recruiting for 200 passionate, committed ambassadors to join them in leading a movement in girls education. Check out all the deets via www.onegirl.org.au/ambassador 💪💃📓
A photo posted by Words With Heart Stationery (@wordswithheart) on


For Lauren, the why is crystal clear. As she puts it,

"Life for a girl receiving an education is filled with opportunity. These girls will live longer, healthier lives, get married later, have fewer, healthier children, and earn more than they would have without an education."


Image via iStock

Words With Heart is currently funding primary and secondary education projects (along with some small business training) in Cambodia, Sierra Leone and Uganda.

Working alongside charity partners such as OneGirl.org.au, and Care.org.au, each stationary product funds a specific number of education days for women and girls in the developing world. Each product shows where its funding goes and how many days of education your money will buy!

Words with Heart wants to fund 500,000 education days by the end of 2016. I don't know about you, but I'm feeling like I might need a notebook.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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