Pixar's short film makes a bold statement about toxic masculinity in the workplace.

Pixar just dropped the first film in its new SparkShorts program, and the film tackles an issue we've never seen discussed in a Pixar film – toxic masculinity.

Its message of gender diversity and inclusion is just as inspirational as what we're used to seeing from the studio.



Purl, written and directed by Kristen Lester and produced by Gillian Libbert-Duncan, follows a pink ball of yarn on her first day of work at B.R.O. Capital.

The titular character starts out her day optimistic and eager to do her best, but is quickly worn down by her inability to fit in with the all-male office culture.

Purl finds herself with doors literally slammed in her face and forced to conform to the norm (and lose her femininity) in order to succeed at her job. It's a story that's all too familiar for many women in the workforce.

Purl is much more adult than Pixar's normal fare. The film contains a few slightly off-color office jokes and language not appropriate for children, or offices, for that matter. But the film has an important message children should be learning from a young age. Gender diversity in the workplace is, indeed, a happy ending.

The film comes from a personal place for Lester, as Purl's experiences follow her own. “It's based on my experience being in animation," Lester says in Pixar's meet-the-filmmakers video. “My first job, I was like the only woman in the room, and so in order to do the thing that I loved, I sort of became one of the guys. And then I came to Pixar and I started to work on teams with women for the first time, and that actually made me realize how much of the female aspect of myself I had sort of buried and left behind."

Lester's experience isn't unique. “When Kristen came to me and said, 'This is a story that I want to tell,' I looked at her and I said, 'Oh my gosh, I have lived the exact same thing,'" said Purl producer Libbert-Duncan.

Pixar's SparkShorts is a more experimental venture for the studio.“The SparkShorts program is designed to discover new storytellers, explore new storytelling techniques, and experiment with new production workflows," said Jim Morris, president of Pixar Animation Studios. “These films are unlike anything we've ever done at Pixar, providing an opportunity to unlock the potential of individual artists and their inventive filmmaking approaches on a smaller scale than our normal fare."

We can expect films Smash an Grab on February 11thand Kitbull on February 18th. It seems like we can expect more positive messages as well.“Diversity and inclusion are at the heart of SparkShorts," said Lindsey Collins, vice president of development for Pixar. “The program was created to provide opportunities to a wide array of artists—each with something unique to say." We're ready to listen!

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Often, parents of children with special needs struggle to find Halloween costumes that will accommodate medical equipment or provide a proper fit. And figuring out how to make one? Yikes.

There's good news; shopDisney has added new ensembles to their already impressive line of adaptive play costumes. And from 8/30 - 9/26, there's a 20% off sale for all costume and costume accessory orders of $75+ with code Spooky.

When looking for the right costume, kids with unique needs have a lot of extra factors to consider: wheelchair wheels get tangled up in too-long material, feeding tubes could get twisted the wrong way, and children with sensory processing disorders struggle with the wrong kind of fabric, seams, or tags. There are a lot of different obstacles that can come between a kid and the ability to wear the costume of their choice, which is why it's so awesome that more and more companies are recognizing the need for inclusive creations that make it easy for everyone to enjoy the magic of make-believe.

Created with inclusivity in mind, the adaptive line is designed to discreetly accommodate tubes or wires from the front or the back, with lots of stretch, extra length and roomier cut, and self-stick fabric closures to make getting dressed hassle-free. The online shop provides details on sizing and breaks down the magical elements of each outfit and accessory, taking the guesswork out of selecting the perfect costume for the whole family.

Your child will be able to defeat Emperor Zurg in comfort with the Buzz Lightyear costume featuring a discreet flap opening at the front for easy tube access, with self-stick fabric closure. There is also an opening at the rear for wheelchair-friendly wear, and longer-length inseams to accommodate seated guests. To infinity and beyond!

An added bonus: many of the costumes offer a coordinating wheelchair cover set to add a major boost of fun. Kids can give their ride a total makeover—all covers are made to fit standard size chairs with 24" wheels—to transform it into anything from The Mandalorian's Razor Crest ship to Cinderella's Coach. Some options even come equipped with sounds and lights!

From babies to adults and adaptive to the group, shopDisney's expansive variety of Halloween costumes and accessories are inclusive of all.

Don't forget about your furry companions! Everyone loves to see a costumed pet trotting around, regardless of the occasion. You can literally dress your four-legged friend to look like Sven from Frozen, which might not sound like something you need in your life but...you totally do. CUTENESS OVERLOAD.

This year has been tough for everyone, so when a child gets that look of unfettered joy that comes from finally getting to wear the costume of their dreams, it's extra rewarding. Don't wait until the last minute to start looking for the right ensemble!


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Photo by Tod Perry

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