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Listen To This 6-Year-Old Call 911 When Her Stepdad Beats Her Mom

Sometimes, it takes a little more than reading about something to move us into action.

Listen To This 6-Year-Old Call 911 When Her Stepdad Beats Her Mom

One of the most interesting things about NFL star Ray Rice’s domestic violence incident was how much more attention it got after the video of him striking his fiancée in the elevator was finally made public.

Do we really need a visual to figure out that something terrible happened when two people entered an elevator and only one (the one who runs into 300-pound linemen on a weekly basis) exited upright?

But the reality is, it was one thing to read about it but something else entirely to see it. When you can actually empathize with the humanity of the situation, your perspective changes.


That’s why I wanted to share this video.

Trigger warning: This is an audio recording of a 911 call made by a 6-year-old girl who is witnessing her mother being beaten by her stepfather. It’s incredibly painful to listen to.

But if hearing it is what it takes to raise greater awareness around domestic violence and the silent victims of domestic violence — the children — then I think this is a video worth sharing.

(If you're on a mobile device, scroll down for a transcript of the call. Though, honestly, it's worth a listen to fully grasp the situation)

This call is from 1991. The audio from it has been used as a tool to educate thousands of people about the issues of domestic violence and the impact it has on children.

More recently, a social worker named Kit Gruelle tracked Lisa down, and they struck up a friendship.

She discovered that Lisa, now a grown woman, was trapped in an abusive relationship herself.

Fortunately, Kit was able to help her out of that relationship.

It may seem unbelievable that someone who grew up in that type of an environment would end up in an abusive relationship herself. But this just goes to show the degree of psychological damage domestic violence can have on young children.

You can read Lisa’s powerful firsthand account of her journey here.

I found this part to be particularly insightful:

And she concludes on this poignant note:

Finally, here's a separate post by someone who attended a conference Kit and Lisa spoke at. Both are important perspectives and well worth the read.

My hope in sharing this is that we can take it beyond those training rooms and raise everyone's awareness. If you agree, I'd really appreciate your help in spreading this far and wide.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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