I first heard about the documentary on a Saturday morning in March.

As usual, I was awoken by one of my children crawling into our bed. It was my older daughter, who brought a book and curled up under the covers. Being the digital addict that I am, I groggily turned on my phone, and something strange was happening — a bunch of people were talking about a documentary, "Under the Dome," that had just been released in China.

Within 24 hours of its release, it had over 100 million views online. Over that first weekend in March, it had over 150 million views.

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Heroes

Maya Angelou tells Dave Chappelle about that time she met Tupac.

Bonus: an interview with Ray Luv, a friend of Tupac, on the rapper's poetic side

When the "Caged Bird" met the "Rose": Maya Angelou, Tupac Shakur, and the power of empathy

Five shots couldn't drop me,
I took it and smiled,
Now I'm back to set the record straight,
With my A-K,
I'm still the thug that you love to hate.
— 2pac, “Hit Em Up"




To the public, politicians, and the media that covered him, Tupac Shakur was the textbook definition of a "thug" — an uncontrollable monster that was poisoning the minds of our youth and corroding our moral fabric. If you looked at him funny, he'd get in your face. If you punched him, he and his posse would jump you. If you shot at him, well…

That's why his chance encounter with Dr. Maya Angelou stood out to most folks.

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He Trashed Hundreds Of Films In His Career. But 13 Years Ago, He Angrily Stood Up For One.

Back in 2002, a tiny indie film called "Better Luck Tomorrow" premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. Financed on maxed-out credit cards, cast with (then) unknown Asian-American actors, and directed by a n00b just a few years removed from film school, "BLT" seemed destined for a life of obscurity.

"Better Luck Tomorrow" was a film about bored, high-achieving Asian-American high school students who get caught up in the thrill of petty crime and end up in a little too deep for their own good.

By all accounts, the initial feedback was positive, but in an industry fueled by hype and buzz, a "moderately positive" audience response is the kiss of death.

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One Woman's Journey Into Sex Slavery And Back In The Heart Of Silicon Valley

Meet Ana. She grew up a mile from Twitter's headquarters but a world apart in the Tenderloin district in San Francisco. It's easy to think sex trafficking is something that only happens in some far off land, but it's also happening right here, in our backyards, in the shadows of some of the wealthiest companies in the world. Just watch and see the strength Ana has in sharing her story to raise awareness in the hopes that she can help others avoid the same fate. At the end of the video, Christian Huang boils it down into a pretty simple but stark choice that continues to press on my heart.

I know what you're thinking: "Hey! Mike Su! San Francisco is NOT in Silicon Valley!"

I say, "I know! But I'm referring to the industry. Like how Burbank is not technically in Hollywood, but Warner Bros. is considered Hollywood."

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