A remarkable rescue was captured on video in Newark Penn Station on Tuesday.

Footage from a NJ Transit Police body camera shows officers Alberto Nunes and Bryan Richards encountering a woman in a bathroom stall in the train station holding a newborn baby. At first you can hear one of the officers saying, "It's not a baby," but it's followed by surprise when they realize that not only was it a baby that the woman appeared to have just given birth to, it was a lifeless shade of gray and was not breathing.

"Working here, you see a lot of things, but expecting a baby in a mother's arms that's a newborn, that's nothing that we would expect," Officer Bryan Richards told WNBC-TV, "I took possession of the baby to do the assessment on it. We didn't know how long the baby was in this world."




New Jersey Transit Police perform CPR to save a lifeless baby www.youtube.com


Officer Richards, a 10 year EMT, quickly brought the child to the sink and began performing CPR using his fingers to deliver the compressions. It did not take long for him to come to the conclusion that the situation was extremely dire and that they could not wait for the paramedics.

The two officers can be seen running to a police car with the infant wrapped in a blanket. As officer Nunes rushed to the hospital, Richards continued the compressions. And then about a minute before they arrived, the child started to show signs of life. Richards can be heard encouraging the baby saying "good girl."

"We just knew what we had to do: Get the baby and (Richards) to the hospital, and that's what we did," Nunes said. "I was so happy, so excited that I heard the baby crying, because that meant the baby was breathing."

Richards added, "It's already high stress, high adrenaline, but once I had the baby crying, it was a big sigh of relief. A happy moment that the baby was crying, and everything we were doing was helping."

The child is currently under evaluation with her mother at University Hospital in Newark, NJ, and is expected to survive.

Forrest Galante will never forget the first time he ever saw a shark in person. "I was 7 or 8 years old and was snorkeling with my grandfather," the outdoor adventure TV personality told Upworthy. "We were in Mozambique where I grew up and I was holding my grandfather's hand underwater as he guided me. It was a small reef shark. What seemed like this huge animal appeared out of nowhere, racing through the darkness and suddenly I was looking into its beautiful eyes. I was in awe but I also think I grabbed my granddad's hand just a little bit tighter."

25 years later, Galante, is a world-renowned conversation activist who hosts the Extinct or Alive program on Animal Planet. He has interacted with some of the planet's most intriguing and intimidating creatures but it's hard to think of a living creature that has more powerfully captured our collective imagination than sharks.

This year, Galante is hosting his schedule special as part of the legendary Shark Week series. In tonight's episode, Galante travels to the northeast coast of South Africa, the "Land of the Lost Sharks," where he looks to find the Pondicherry, a species of shark believed to have gone extinct decades ago.


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