Kevin Hart and Snoop Dogg's uncensored Olympics commentary is hilarious

When the COVID-19 pandemic socially distanced the world and pushed off the 2020 Olympics, we knew the games weren't going to be the same. The fact that they're even happening this year is a miracle, but without spectators and the usual hustle and bustle surrounding the events, it definitely feels different.

But it's not just the games themselves that have changed. The coverage of the Olympics has changed as well, including the unexpected addition of un-expert, uncensored commentary from comedian Kevin Hart and rapper Snoop Dogg on NBC's Peacock.

In the topsy-turvy world we're currently living in, it's both a refreshing and hilarious addition to the Olympic lineup.

Just watch this clip of them narrating an equestrian event. (Language warning if you've got kiddos nearby. The first video is bleeped, but the others aren't.)


The duo has been sharing their unbridled thoughts since the opening ceremony:

Watch Kevin Hart explain to Snoop why the lane 8 gold medal upset is such a big deal in swimming:

Here they discuss how adding a word to a sport makes it a whole new sport, and Snoop proves he's as quick as any comedian on the fly.

"Oh, that's Auntie! Look at Auntie! Go ahead!" Snoop says, as 46-year-old Oksana Chusovitina performs the vault in gymnastics. Hilarious.

So many times since the pandemic started, it's felt like we've just collectively tossed up our hands and said, "Whatever!" With Kevin Hart and Snoop Dogg commentating on the Olympics, it feels like that's what Peacock did, and the coverage is all the better for it. We all need to laugh, and if it takes Snoop Dogg talking about Olympic dressage horses "Crip walking" to make it happen, so be it.

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Shanda Lynn Poitra was born and raised on the Turtle Mountain Reservation in Belcourt, North Dakota. She lived there until she was 24 years old when she left for college at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks.

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I walked into class on a Friday thinking that I would simply learn how to handle a person trying to rob me, and I walked out on a Sunday evening with a voice so powerful that I could handle the most passive attacks to my being, along with physical attacks."

It didn't take long for her to notice the difference the class was making in her life.

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via Matt Radick / Flickr

Joe Biden reversed Donald Trump's ban on transgender people serving in the military earlier this year, allowing the entire LGBTQ community to serve for the first time.

Anti-gay sentiment in the U.S. military goes as far back as 1778 when Lieutenant Frederick Gotthold Enslin was convicted at court-martial on charges of sodomy and perjury. The military would go on to make sodomy a crime in 1920 and worthy of dishonorable discharge.

In 1949 the Department of Defense standardized its anti-LGBT regulations across the military, declaring: "Homosexual personnel, irrespective of sex, should not be permitted to serve in any branch of the Armed Forces in any capacity, and prompt separation of known homosexuals from the Armed Forces is mandatory."

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