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An old male bald eagle who adopted a rock as an egg has just been given a real foster baby

People are totally invested in Murphy becoming a real dad after he spent weeks nurturing his "RockBaby."

Murphy meets a rescued eaglet—his new foster baby.

On March 8, 2023, a keeper at World Bird Sanctuary in St. Louis County, Missouri, noticed something odd. A male bald eagle named Murphy was guarding what appeared to be a large depression in the ground.

“The spot was sparsely but carefully decorated with leaves and branches, and featured a simple rock right in the center,” the nature preserve shared on its Facebook page.

Murphy began sitting on the rock, nudging it and becoming fiercely protective of it, as it if were an egg. People visiting the sanctuary would inquire about the bald eagle just sitting there, wondering if he was okay. The keepers finally put up a sign that read:

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Photo by Jenn on Unsplash

Kiwi is a blue Indian ringneck parrot with an adorable personality on TikTok.

The fact that we live on a planet where birds can talk is so unbelievably weird that sometimes we forget it happens.

Yes, they mimic human voices (as well as other sounds) but it's not just random repetition. Parrots are wicked smart. Research has shown that they have sophisticated problem-solving capabilities, can communicate what they want and can do basic addition and subtraction. They can even understand the concept of zero.

So when a pet parrot talks, they really are talking. The more their vocabulary grows, the more they can genuinely communicate. And the more they communicate, the more we are amazed by the fact that they can.

One pet parrot named Kiwi has taken TikTok by storm with his funny phrases and adorable affections, and it's not hard to see why so many of his videos have gone viral.

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Saving the life of one small animal among the billions upon billions of living things on Earth may not seem significant in the big picture, but when that one small animal's life is in your hands, it means the world.

Yassin Elmahgoub is a medical student from Egypt who recently shared the journey of a tiny baby parrot he rescued. The parrot, who he named Mumble, was born with birth defects and wasn't able to stand or walk. With the help of a parrot behavior consultant, Elmahgoub hand-fed Mumble, nursed him to good health and helped him develop mobility.

In a TikTok video that's been viewed more than 8 million times, Elmahgoub shared Mumble's journey from his earliest days until he was finally able to walk on his own.

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via Ostdrossel / Instagram

Lisa is a lifelong bird enthusiast who goes by the name Ostdrossel on social media. A few years ago, the Germany native moved to Michigan and was fascinated by the new birds she encountered.

Upon arriving in the winter, she fell in love with the goldfinches, cardinals, and Blue Jays. Then in the spring, she was taken by the hummingbirds.

"My Dad is a photographer and I have studied media, so it felt like a natural thing to eventually begin experimenting with photography," she told Diply. "The subjects were so beautiful and foreign. I wanted to share with my family and friends in Germany too."

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Although Lisa is secrative about how she takes such stunning photographs, she did give Upworthy an inside look at her camera set-up.

"I am basically using a weatherproof box to which I added a macro lens and put an action camera inside (think GoPro), mine is made by GitUp," she wrote in an email to Upworthy.

Lisa's camera can take photos, video, and is equipped with motion detection and timelapse features.

To lure the birds to the box, she mounts it on a tripod with a baffle underneath to "keep critters from reaching the food," she said. Lisa is also able to attach "various feed containers to" the tripod, such as "glass bowls or hummingbird feeders."

If she leaves the camera out all day, it can take up to 20,000 photos.

"My evening pleasure and routine is to go through all of them, delete the bad ones and keep and slightly edit the ones I deem publishable," she told MyModernMet.

Here are some of the most beautiful, up-close images she's taken.

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