Rule-breaking cockatoo was caught destroying anti-bird spikes
Photo by Debora Cardenas on Unsplash

Bird spikes are a more humane way to keep birds from perching in public places, but it turns out, they don't work on every bird. Specifically, one cockatoo in Katoomba, New South Wales, Australia. The bird was spotted destroying anti-bird spikes in a shopping center like it's his job. Getting hit with bird droppings from a perching bird is pretty bad, but getting hit with metal anti-bird spikes thrown by an angry bird is worse.

Isaac Sherring-Tito noticed the bird ripping off the spikes and took a video which he posted with the title, "F*ck the police." The cockatoo can be seen using its beak and claws to destroy the metal anti-bird spikes, throw them to the ground, then seemingingly laughing over his bad behavior. The video of the bad-ass bird went viral, because it's not every day that you see a member of the animal kingdom sticking it to authority in such a punk way.

Most of the comments on the video were positive, but one Twitter user knew exactly what this bird's game is. Apparently he's pretty notorious in the area for causing all sorts of mischief, including conning tourists out of food. If you ever visit this shopping center, consider yourself warned.


RELATED: People can't stop watching this video of a parrot who told Alexa to stop playing Frank Sinatra music


RELATED: This man fed a family of crows for years — then they started bringing him presents

It's actually not out of character for a cockatoo to behave so badly. Sean Dooley, editor of Australian Birdlife, told The Guardian that cockatoos "seem to take great enjoyment" in destruction, "whether it is random vandalism or more strategic damage." In other words, they know exactly what they're doing when it comes to mischief and mayhem.

Cockatoos, which are a type of parrot, are extremely intelligent and have the object-permanence skills of a four-year-old human person. They're also zygodactyl, which means they have two toes that point forward and two toes that point backwards, allowing them to use their feet the way humans use our hands, meaning nobody is safe when a cockatoo is around.

This article originally appeared on November 11, 2015


Remember those beloved Richard Scarry books from when you were a kid?

Like a lot of people, I grew up reading them. And now, I read them to my kids.

The best!

If that doesn't ring a bell, perhaps this character from the "Busytown" series will. Classic!

Image via

Scarry was an incredibly prolific children's author and illustrator. He created over 250 books during his career. His books were loved across the world — over 100 million were sold in many languages.

But here's something you may not have known about these classics: They've been slowly changing over the years.

Don't panic! They've been changing in a good way.

Keep Reading Show less

Images from Denver Animal Shelter's Facebook page.

Imagine rummaging through secondhand finds in your local thrift store, only to find that some items include a bonus feline at no extra charge.

Montequlla the orange tabby had somehow not gotten the memo that he and his family were moving. As they dropped off furniture, including a big recliner chair, to the Denver Arc Thrift Store on New Year’s Eve, they had no idea that poor little Montequlla was tucked away inside.

Luckily, the staff began to notice the chair meowing.

Keep Reading Show less

"Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (1937) and actor Peter Dinklage.

On Tuesday, Upworthy reported that actor Peter Dinklage was unhappy with Disney’s decision to move forward with a live-action version of “Snow White and the Seven Drawfs” starring Rachel Zegler.

Dinklage praised Disney’s inclusive casting of the “West Side Story” actress, whose mother is of Colombian descent, but pointed out that, at the same time, the company was making a film that promotes damaging stereotypes about people with dwarfism.

"There's a lot of hypocrisy going on, I've gotta say, from being somebody who's a little bit unique," Dinklage told Marc Maron on his “WTF” podcast.

"Well, you know, it's really progressive to cast a—literally no offense to anybody, but I was a little taken aback by, they were very proud to cast a Latino actress as Snow White," Dinklage said, "but you're still telling the story of 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.' Take a step back and look at what you're doing there.”

Keep Reading Show less