Rule-breaking cockatoo was caught destroying anti-bird spikes

Photo by Debora Cardenas on Unsplash

Bird spikes are a more humane way to keep birds from perching in public places, but it turns out, they don't work on every bird. Specifically, one cockatoo in Katoomba, New South Wales, Australia. The bird was spotted destroying anti-bird spikes in a shopping center like it's his job. Getting hit with bird droppings from a perching bird is pretty bad, but getting hit with metal anti-bird spikes thrown by an angry bird is worse.

Isaac Sherring-Tito noticed the bird ripping off the spikes and took a video which he posted with the title, "F*ck the police." The cockatoo can be seen using its beak and claws to destroy the metal anti-bird spikes, throw them to the ground, then seemingingly laughing over his bad behavior. The video of the bad-ass bird went viral, because it's not every day that you see a member of the animal kingdom sticking it to authority in such a punk way.

Most of the comments on the video were positive, but one Twitter user knew exactly what this bird's game is. Apparently he's pretty notorious in the area for causing all sorts of mischief, including conning tourists out of food. If you ever visit this shopping center, consider yourself warned.


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It's actually not out of character for a cockatoo to behave so badly. Sean Dooley, editor of Australian Birdlife, told The Guardian that cockatoos "seem to take great enjoyment" in destruction, "whether it is random vandalism or more strategic damage." In other words, they know exactly what they're doing when it comes to mischief and mayhem.

Cockatoos, which are a type of parrot, are extremely intelligent and have the object-permanence skills of a four-year-old human person. They're also zygodactyl, which means they have two toes that point forward and two toes that point backwards, allowing them to use their feet the way humans use our hands, meaning nobody is safe when a cockatoo is around.

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