For years, international pop icon Mariah Carey was living with a condition that greatly affected her life — but she kept it a secret and even refused treatment.

In a new interview, Carey revealed that she was diagnosed with bipolar II disorder back in 2001 after a mental breakdown. However, fear of being publicly outed led her to keep the diagnosis a secret, and refuse treatment, until recently.

"I lived in denial and isolation and in constant fear someone would expose me," she said. "It was too heavy a burden to carry and I simply couldn’t do that anymore. I sought and received treatment, I put positive people around me and I got back to doing what I love — writing songs and making music."

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'I don't have anything to hide': Passion Pit singer broadcasts live bipolar treatment.

'I don't have anything to hide. I think this is an amazing treatment.'

Michael Angelakos, lead singer of the band Passion Pit, began a Facebook Live video in quite the unexpected way on April 4, 2017.

He was about to start a procedure many of us have never even heard of, let alone have had performed.

“So, everybody, this is Bobby," he explained to the tens of thousands of fans watching, a medical professional by his side. "And I’m getting TMS today — transcranial magnetic stimulation."

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The livelihoods of an estimated 24 million Americans — with real challenges and real families — are at stake with even the smallest of tweaks to the Affordable Care Act. Their stories deserve to be told.

Here are five of those powerful stories that show what's at stake, should the Affordable Care Act be repealed.

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This story was originally published on The Mighty.

I have Bipolar 1, the most severe form of bipolar. I was diagnosed almost 10 years ago. It took me about three years to get on the right meds.

Throughout those three years, I cycled through episodes of mania and depression. It resulted in three hospitalizations. Once I was on the right medication cocktail, I stabilized — at least, I became as stable as anyone with a severe mental illness can be. Despite the five medications I take for my mood disorder and anxiety, I still deal with symptoms.

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