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An actress decided to do something about the stigma of mental illness.

When Glenn Close's family members were diagnosed with mental illnesses, she wanted to change how the world treated them. So she started an organization called Bring Change 2 Mind to help people start talking about mental health.

An actress decided to do something about the stigma of mental illness.

The most important thing I want you to see here is this:


It's true. Since we're all in this together, who are we really hurting when we place a stigma on mental illness? Yeah. All of us.



Young people these days (I can't believe I just said that. Oof.) are excellent at getting the word out and creating social change. As the ladies say below, it's partly their responsibility to get the conversation going.

And the good news is:

We have to start really talking about mental health in order to literally save lives. When people are ashamed of their illnesses, they hide them. The quieter we stay, the less likely people are to seek help. And for some, that can mean greater chances of suicide and self-harm. I have lost four people to suicide in the past couple of years. That's four people too many.

If you share this, you may help someone feel less alone, more likely to speak up. It's worth a try, right?

If you're in the U.S. and need help immediately, please call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 800-273-TALK (8255).

via Angie Jones / Twitter and Matt Blaze / Flickr

Software developer Angie Jones' recent girls trip revealed that America still has a long way to go when it comes to race.

To most, that's not surprising. But what's unique is how the specific experience Jones and her friends went through revealed the pervasive way systemic racism still runs through our culture.

Jones is the Senior Director of Developer Relations at Applitools, holds 26 patented inventions in the United States of America and Japan, and is an IBM Master Inventor.

On July 27, she tweeted about a flight she took with nine other Black women and they all sat in first class. "People literally could not process how it was possible," she wrote. "Staff tried to send us to regular lines. Passengers made snide remarks. One guy even yelled 'are they a higher class of people than I am?!'"

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