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17 people reveal the most 'wholesome secret' they've never told anyone before

"Instead of a dark one, what wholesome secret are you hiding?”

via Pexels

Some people's secrets are dark, others are wholesome.

There’s an old adage you’ll often hear in recovery groups:

“We’re only as sick as our secrets.”

The phrase means that a secret kept in the dark grows and becomes more harmful, but when it is exposed in the light of day, its power is lost.

However, that saying only refers to the dark secrets we keep. What about the nice things we do for others without ever telling anyone? When we hold onto the positive things we’ve done for others does it make us happier because we did something without ever asking for credit?

Does doing good things in secret lead to a positive cycle of doing more and more good?

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Pop Culture

Someone asked strangers online to share life's essential lessons. Here are the 17 best.

There's a bit of advice here for everyone—from financial wisdom to mental health tips.

Photo by Miguel Bruna on Unsplash

Failure is a great teacher.

It’s true that life never gets easier, and we only get continuously better at our lives. Childhood’s lessons are simple—this is how you color in the lines, 2 + 2 = 4, brush your teeth twice a day, etc. As we get older, lessons keep coming, and though they might still remain simple in their message, truly understanding them can be difficult. Often we learn the hard way.

The good news is, the “hard way” is indeed a great teacher. Learning the hard way often involves struggle, mistakes and failure. While these feelings are undeniably uncomfortable, being patient and persistent enough to move through them often leaves us not only wiser in having gained the lesson, but more confident, assured and emotionally resilient. If that’s not growth, I don’t know what is.

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Identity

What's wrong with aging? Here are 17 pleasures people only started to enjoy as they got older.

Don’t let the youngsters fool you. There’s nothing wrong with a quiet night in and a good night's sleep.

A lady happily spends time with herself.

American culture has always been obsessed with youth and vitality. It feels like after you reach the age of 35 you become invisible. That’s why we fret over gray hair and wrinkles and spend nearly $17 billion a year on cosmetic surgery.

The funny thing is that studies show people get happier as they age.

So why are we obsessing over being young when we should just relax and enjoy the self-acceptance and wisdom that comes with aging?

As people age, they also start to enjoy things that they previously didn’t like or hadn’t experienced. Older people are better at slowing down, being present and appreciating the world around them instead of looking to see what’s coming around the corner. They develop an instinctual knowledge that joy comes from being in the moment.

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Pop Culture

12 things every American has in their house, according to non-Americans

“This is the most wholesome I've felt about my country in a while.”

"You can never have too much BBQ sauce." – American

For a country that’s so diverse, America has some obvious cultural staples, especially visible to those who don't live in the U.S. Surprisingly—and thankfully—those staples don’t always conjure up a cringeworthy image of ignorance, bravado or unsavory politics.

Self-described “non-Americans” listed things that would be found in every American home, and a lot of the responses could remind Americans of what they might take for granted—whether it’s the ever-expanding variety of foodstuffs or appliances that make everyday life easier.

But perhaps more importantly, they could add a new level of appreciation (and perhaps a sigh of relief) given the amount of, let’s say, bad press the nation has been receiving as of late.

“This is the most wholesome I've felt about my country in a while,” noted one American after reading the thread.

The answers were also astonishingly accurate, as indicated by some of the comments.

“I haven't seen a single one I don't have tbh and I don't know how to feel about it lol,” wrote one American.

The answers were prompted by Reddit user Ryrylx, who asked, “Non-Americans, what do you think every American person has in their house?” to the online forum.

Below are 12 answers—along with a few funny confirmations from Americans—for your viewing pleasure.

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