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Some of these pianos are decorated with paint, some with grass. Find them in the park and go nuts.

When I lived in New York, it took a lot to phase me. Between dancers breaking into routines on the subway and poets spontaneously performing on the streets, bold public art was the norm.

Some of these pianos are decorated with paint, some with grass. Find them in the park and go nuts.

But one day I noticed something that actually gave me pause.

It was one of those warm and cuddly "Awww … now THIS is why I love New York moments." As I found myself walking through different boroughs of the city, I'd see brightly colored pianos in parks and other — what I thought were random — outdoor spaces. It turns out that these musical instruments have been sprinkled throughout the communities since 2006.


Image of Sing for Hope piano by CBSNews.com.

Sing for Hope is the organization that's responsible for this mysterious piano trail. The nonprofit, powered by volunteer artists, seeks to make art and music accessible to all.

Their piano project, which was highlighted by Nick Dietz in a story for CBSNews.com, was started by Monica Yunus and Camille Zamora. They also happen to be BFFs and successful sopranos themselves.

Here's how the magical initiative works.

Generous people and organizations from all over New York donate pianos. Once the instruments are inspected and approved to withstand the fun journey ahead, a team of artists brings the pianos to life. They deck them out with colors, inspiring messages, and eye-catching designs. No two pianos are the same.

The precious instruments are then placed in outdoor spaces throughout the five boroughs of New York. There are no instructions or special guests of honor. Their simple placement is invitation enough for folks in the community to experiment and play.

This guy was inspired during the Sing for Hope public installation. Image by CBSNews.com.

The best part about this program is that people who may not have access to a piano or be able to afford to hear live music can do so during the 16-day public installation period.

In a telephone interview with Rachel Benichak, a representative for Sing for Hope, she explained:

"Communities really rally around these. These are beautiful pieces created by artists that took hundreds of hours to make and are then placed outside. We've seen friendships formed, proposals — impromptu happenings. Normal people interact with the pianos and it makes their communities better. It's a really fun project."

But the fun doesn't stop there.

After each summer exhibit, the pianos are shipped to their next destination — schools, hospitals, and community organizations.

Teachers at P94M, The SPECTRUM School, in Manhattan's East Village, were ecstatic when they were gifted a Sing for Hope piano in 2013. Music exploration is helping their students develop their voices.

"We work with children with emotional disturbance, children with autism, children with intellectual disabilities. This provides a very therapeutic space for them," says Tessa Defner, an arts coach.

After the pianos are delivered to the various community organizations, Sing for Hope supplies each location with artists who give piano lessons and classes on interpreting the instrument's design.

A child at P94M using a Sing for Hope piano. Image by CBSNews.com.

It's a win-win for students, artists, and the community at large. To learn more about this inspiring effort, check out the video below.

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A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
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A 2015 survey conducted by the National Union of Students found that 60% of respondents turned to porn to fill in the gaps in sex education. While 40% of those people said they learned a little, 75% of respondents said they felt porn created unrealistic expectations when it comes to sex. Some of the unrealistic expectations from porn can be dangerous. A study found that 88% of porn contained violence, and another study found that those who consumed porn were more likely to become sexually aggressive.

But now the thing that breaks those unrealistic expectations… might also be porn? Pornhub has launched a sex education section.

The adult website's first series is simply titled, "Pornhub Sex Ed" and contains 11 videos and is accessible through the Pornhub Sexual Wellness Center. The section also contains articles, some showing real anatomy and examples in order to bust myths people may have picked up on other portions of the website.

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True

A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.

Eight months into the coronavirus pandemic and it feels like disinformation and denial have spread as quickly as the virus itself. Unfortunately, disinformation and denial during a pandemic is deadly. Literally. People who refuse to accept the reality we're living in, who go about daily life as if nothing unusual were happening, who won't wear a mask or keep their distance from people, are preventing communities from being able to keep the pandemic under control—with very real consequences.

An ER nurse in South Dakota shared her experience treating COVID patients—some of whom refuse to believe they have COVID—and it's really shocking. One might think that the virus would become real to people if they were directly affected by it, but apparently that's just not true for some. As Jodi Doering wrote on Twitter:

"I have a night off from the hospital. As I'm on my couch with my dog I can't help but think of the Covid patients the last few days. The ones that stick out are those who still don't believe the virus is real. The ones who scream at you for a magic medicine and that Joe Biden is going to ruin the USA. All while gasping for breath on 100% Vapotherm. They tell you there must be another reason they are sick. They call you names and ask why you have to wear all that 'stuff' because they don't have COViD because it's not real. Yes. This really happens. And I can't stop thinking about it. These people really think this isn't going to happen to them. And then they stop yelling at you when they get intubated. It's like a fucking horror movie that never ends. There's no credits that roll. You just go back and do it all over again."

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While many of us have understandably let the challenges of 2020 get under our skin and bring us down, a young man from Florida was securing his place in the Guinness Book of World Records. Chris Nikic became the first person with Down syndrome to complete a full triathlon.

For the majority of people, a 2.4 mile swim, a 112 mile bike ride or a 26.2 mile run would be difficult on its own. The Ironman competition requires participants to complete them all in one grueling race. In a statement, Special Olympics Florida President and CEO Sherry Wheelock called Chris "an inspiration to all of us." She continued, "We are incredibly proud of Chris and the work he has put in to achieve this monumental goal. He's become a hero to athletes, fans, and people across Florida and around the world."

Nikic's journey to become an Ironman started off as a challenge far less lofty. He and his father, Nik, created the "1 percent better challenge." The idea was to keep Chris motivated during the pandemic and beyond. According to The Washington Post, the idea was for Chris to improve his workouts by one percent each day because he "doesn't like pain" but loves "food, videos games and my couch." The plan was to keep building strength and stamina while keeping his eye on the grand prize of completing a triathlon. Nik told the Panama City News Herald, "I was concerned because after high school and after graduation a lot of kids with Down syndrome become isolated and just start living a life of isolation. I said, 'Look, let's go find him something to get him back into the world and get him involved,' so we started looking around and we were fortunate that at the same time Special Olympics Florida started this triathlon program, and I thought, 'What a great way to get him started, get him in shape and get him to make some friends.'"


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