The San Antonio Food Bank was swamped by 10,000 families in one day, and the images are surreal

We know that many families are taking a huge economic hit from the coronavirus pandemic, but images from the San Antonio Food Bank from last week illustrate that fact in a stark way.

On Thursday, more than 10,000 families showed up at various distribution centers around the city to receive some of the food distribution the food bank had planned. About 6,000 families had preregistered online, but nearly double that number showed up. One large distribution site—Traders Village, a flea market on the south side of the city—saw thousands of cars lining up at dawn, with one person having camped out the night before.


Due to the high demand, the distribution event ended four hours after its planned closing time, as thousands of people waited out the day in 90-plus degree heat.

"It was a rough one today," Food Bank president and CEO Eric Cooper told San Antonio Express-News. "We have never executed on as large of a demand as we are now."

Reporter Marina Starleaf Riker shared photos of the distribution on Twitter, and they were so shocking that many people didn't believe that they were real, despite the accompanying news report.

"We tried to qualify people on site," Cooper added. "There were a few folks who showed up that didn't qualify…but then there were those who showed up and said, 'I heard this was happening. I didn't know I had to register, but I need food. I am a hotel worker and I was laid off.' Those are the stories we heard from a lot of people who showed up."

Even the planned distribution was a feat of enormous magnitude. A troupe of 400 volunteers showed up to distribute a million pounds of food brought in on 25 tractor-trailers to the 6,000 families that had registered. But since thousands more showed up, the food bank turned to their warehouse to bring in even more truckloads of food.

10,000 seek S.A. Food Bank help as COVID-19 ravages economy www.expressnews.com

"There really wasn't much left over," Cooper said. "It was a bit of a miracle that we were able to get done what we got done."

Cooper is concerned about keeping up with the increased need. Due to rising demand and waning supply, Cooper worries the food bank will run out of food within three weeks. Grocery stores and restaurants usually donated surpluses or leftovers, which obviously isn't happening now that stores are running low and restaurants are shuttered.

10,000 families came to the San Antonio Food Bank as the coronavirus crisis www.youtube.com


To stem the tide, the food bank has submitted a State of Texas Assistance Request with the Department of Emergency Management, asking for $12 million to be able to purchase food.

We are now at a level where we are having to buy food, and dollars are going very quickly," Cooper said. "The $12 million from the state will help us stock our shelves with peanut butter and soups and chili and stew and rice and beans and corn and green beans and all of those staple items families need in their pantry to nourish their family."

As the economic impact of the global attempt to limit the spread of the coronavirus sinks in, we will undoubtedly be seeing a greater need for the assistance food banks offer. The dramatic footage from San Antonio can be seen as a wake-up call for other cities and for individuals to make sure that those who are able are donating what they can to help their communities get through this difficult period.



Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
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Glenda moved to Houston from Ohio just before the pandemic hit. She didn't know that COVID-19-related delays would make it difficult to get her Texas driver's license and apply for unemployment benefits. She quickly found herself in an impossible situation — stranded in a strange place without money for food, gas, or a job to provide what she needed.

Alone, hungry, and scared, Glenda dialed 2-1-1 for help. The person on the other end of the line directed her to the Houston-based nonprofit Bread of Life, founded by St. John's United Methodist pastors Rudy and Juanita Rasmus.

For nearly 30 years, Bread of Life has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention, eliminating food insecurity, providing permanent housing to formerly homeless individuals and disaster relief.

Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

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Yesterday I was perusing comments on an Upworthy article about Joe Biden comforting the son of a Parkland shooting victim and immediately had flashbacks to the lead-up of the 2016 election. In describing former vice President Biden, some commenters were using the words "criminal," "corrupt," and "pedophile—exactly the same words people used to describe Hillary Clinton in 2016.

I remember being baffled that so many people were so convinced of Clinton's evil schemes that they genuinely saw the documented serial liar and cheat that she was running against as the lesser of two evils. I mean, sure, if you believe that a career politician had spent years being paid off by powerful people and was trafficking children to suck their blood in her free time, just about anything looks like a better alternative.

But none of that was true.

It's been four years and Hillary Clinton has been found guilty of exactly none of the criminal activity she was being accused of. Trump spent every campaign rally leading chants of "Lock her up!" under the guise that she was going to go to jail after the election. He's been president for nearly four years now, and where is Clinton? Not in jail—she's comfy at home, occasionally trolling Trump on Twitter and doing podcasts.

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Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
True

Glenda moved to Houston from Ohio just before the pandemic hit. She didn't know that COVID-19-related delays would make it difficult to get her Texas driver's license and apply for unemployment benefits. She quickly found herself in an impossible situation — stranded in a strange place without money for food, gas, or a job to provide what she needed.

Alone, hungry, and scared, Glenda dialed 2-1-1 for help. The person on the other end of the line directed her to the Houston-based nonprofit Bread of Life, founded by St. John's United Methodist pastors Rudy and Juanita Rasmus.

For nearly 30 years, Bread of Life has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention, eliminating food insecurity, providing permanent housing to formerly homeless individuals and disaster relief.

Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

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via Jody Danielle Fisher / Facebook

Breast milk is an incredibly magical food. The wonderful thing is that it's produced by a collaboration between mother and baby.

British mother Jody Danielle Fisher shared the miracle of this collaboration on Facebook recently after having her 13-month-old child vaccinated.

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With the election quickly approaching, the importance of voting and sending in your ballot on time is essential. But there is another way you can vote everyday - by being intentional with each dollar you spend. Support companies and products that uphold your values and help create a more sustainable world. An easy move is swapping out everyday items that are often thrown away after one use or improperly disposed of.

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Package Free Shop

2. Last Swab - Replacement for single use plastic cotton swabs. Nearly 25.5 billion single use swabs are produced and discarded every year in the U.S., but not this one. It lasts up to 1,000 uses as it's able to be cleaned with soap and water. It also comes in a biodegradable, corn based case so you can use it on the go!

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