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Oprah dished to Ellen what she thought about Trump's tweet attacking her.

On Feb. 18, President Donald Trump claimed Oprah Winfrey — Oprah Winfrey, of all people — is "very insecure."

"Just watched a very insecure Oprah Winfrey ... interview a panel of people on '60 Minutes,'" Trump wrote. "The questions were biased and slanted, the facts incorrect."

The "60 Minutes" episode he's referring to featured Winfrey chatting with 14 voters from Grand Rapids, Michigan. Seven of the voters had supported Trump in the 2016 election, and seven had not.


Winfrey dropped in on the Feb. 21 episode of "The Ellen DeGeneres Show," and Trump's tweet inevitably came up.

"Speaking of tequila," DeGeneres segued, as seen in a clip from the episode. "Have you been drinking an extra amount since that tweet that the president put out? ... What was it like for you to find out about that?”

Winfrey paused for a moment. “I woke up and I just thought…” she said, before throwing her hands up and shaking her head.

[rebelmouse-image 19477330 dam="1" original_size="500x253" caption="GIF via "The Ellen DeGeneres Show."" expand=1]GIF via "The Ellen DeGeneres Show."

“I don’t like giving negativity power," she noted. "So I just thought ... ‘what?’"

Winfrey did, however, take issue with the president's claim that the episode — which touched on a variety of topics, including the GOP's tax legislation, the #MeToo movement, and Trump's fitness for office — had been biased against him. "60 Minutes" had many producers working to make sure the framing of the questions and the editing of the segments were fair and nonpartisan, Winfrey explained.

If anything, she argued, Winfrey had been a voice ensuring the conservatives' viewpoints were on display. “I was working very hard to do the opposite of what I was hate-tweeted about," she said, giving DeGeneres a specific example to illustrate her point.

DeGeneres also asked Winfrey about another hot button issue facing the country: gun violence.

Winfrey recently announced she'd be following in George and Amal Clooney's footsteps and give $500,000 to March for Our Lives — a student-organized demonstration in Washington, D.C., pushing for more gun control legislation.

The event, planned for March 24, is being organized in large part by the teens who survived the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida, which left 17 people dead.

As Winfrey hinted in her tweet, the high schoolers leading the way on this issue inspired her to speak up and donate to the demonstration — funds that will be used on things like hotels and transportation — to make sure as many young people can attend the event next month as possible.

“This is exactly what happened during the civil rights movement," Winfrey told DeGeneres. "People like John Lewis and Diane Nash: They were 18, 19, 20 years old. Young people who said, ‘We’ve had enough.’ And these kids [today] are right there."

Winfrey did give the students some advice in the weeks and months ahead, though: It can't just be protesting in the street — they need to stay organized for the long haul. "The reason why the civil rights movement worked was because there was a strategy," she said. "There was a plan."

Watch Winfrey talk about her support for March for Our Lives in the clip below:


We all know that Americans pay more for healthcare than every other country in the world. But how much more?

According an American expatriate who shared the story of his ER visit in a Taiwanese hospital, Americans are being taken to the cleaners when we go to the doctor. We live in a country that claims to be the greatest in the world, but where an emergency trip to the hospital can easily bankrupt someone.

Kevin Bozeat had that fact in mind when he fell ill while living in Taiwan and needed to go to the hospital. He didn't have insurance and he had no idea how much it was going to cost him. He shared the experience in a now-viral Facebook post he called "The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience."

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With permission from Sarah Cooper.

Men and the feels.


Note: This an excerpt is from Sarah Cooper's book, How to Be Successful Without Hurting Men's Feelings.

In this fast-paced business world, female leaders need to make sure they're not perceived as pushy, aggressive, or competent.

One way to do that is to alter your leadership style to account for the fragile male ego.

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Family

10 things kids get in trouble for that adults get away with all the time

Why do we expect children to have more self-control than grown-ups?

Photo by Keren Fedida on Unsplash

Kids know when we're being hypocritical.

Raising kids is tough and no parent does it perfectly. Each child is different, each has their own personalities, strengths and challenges, and each of them requires something different from their parents in order to flourish.

But there's one thing that parents have long said, with their actions if not with their words, that justifiably drives kids bonkers: "Do as I say, not as I do."

To be fair, both moral and actual law dictate that there are things that adults can do that kids can't. Children can't drive or consume alcohol, for example, so it's not hypocritical for adults to do those things while telling kids they cannot. There are other things—movies, TV shows, books, etc.—that parents have to decide whether their kids are ready for or not based on their age and developmental stage, and that's also to be expected.

But there are some gaps between what adults do and what they expect kids to do that aren't so easy to reconcile.

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Joy

Her boyfriend asked her to draw a comic about their relationship. Hilarity ensued.

The series combines humor and playful drawings with spot-on depictions of the intense familiarity that long-standing coupledom often brings.

All images by Catana Chetwynd


"It was all his idea."

An offhand suggestion from her boyfriend of two years coupled with her own lifelong love of comic strips like "Calvin and Hobbes" and "Get Fuzzy" gave 22-year-old Catana Chetwynd the push she needed to start drawing an illustrated series about long-term relationships.

Specifically, her own relationship.

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Identity

My wife surprised her coworkers when she came out as trans. Then they surprised her.

She was ready for one reaction but was greeted with a beautiful response.

All photos by Amanda Jette, used with permission.

Zoe comes out to her coworkers.


Society, pay attention. This is important.

My wife, Zoe, is transgender. She came out to us — the kids and me — last summer and then slowly spread her beautiful feminine wings with extended family, friends, and neighbors.

A little coming out here, a little coming out there — you know how it is.

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It started with a simple, sincere question from a mother of an 11-year-old boy.

An anonymous mother posted a question to Quora, a website where people can ask questions and other people can answer them. This mother wrote:

How do I tell my wonderful 11 year old son, (in a way that won't tear him down), that the way he has started talking to me (disrespectfully) makes me not want to be around him (I've already told him the bad attitude is unacceptable)?

It's a familiar scenario for those of us who have raised kids into the teen years. Our sweet, snuggly little kids turn into moody middle schoolers seemingly overnight, and sometimes we're left reeling trying to figure out how to handle their sensitive-yet-insensitive selves.


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