Mr. Singh caught a teenager stealing from his store. His response has gone viral for all the right reasons.

Most of us have a knee-jerk reaction when we see a crime taking place: call the cops.

It’s often the smart move to protect the safety of those in the immediate area, but sometimes it’s unnecessary. Especially when the consequences of being arrested might far outweigh the seriousness of the crime.

A 7-11 owner in Toledo, Ohio is being praised for not calling the cops on a teenager that he caught stealing from his store. Instead, he saw the crime as an opportunity to practice kindness.


Jay Singh was alerted to a teen stealing by a clerk, so he went to look at the security footage to confirm. He then approached the teen at the checkout counter and asked him, “Do you want me to call the cops or will you take it out?”

The teenager removed the stolen items from his pockets and Singh asked him why he stole. “He said, ‘I’m stealing for myself. I’m hungry, and I’m doing it for my younger brother,’” Singh recalled.

The store owner then gave the teen a bag full of pizza and sandwiches, free of charge, and sent him on his way.

Customer Cedric Bishop witnessed Sing's generosity and kindness and posted about it on Facebook and the post quickly went viral.

The post received some warmhearted comments.

via Cedric Bishop / Facebook

via Cedric Bishop / Facebook

via Cedric Bishop / Facebook

via Cedric Bishop / Facebook

via Cedric Bishop / Facebook

Singh’s generosity is a reminder that often crimes are committed out of desperation, not malice. It’s also a gentle reminder that we can solve problems one-on-one without having to enlist the state or subject the perpetrator to a heartless justice system.

“It’s not going to make any difference to me if I give him some food because we make a lot of food, we sell a lot of food,” said Singh. “If he goes to jail then he's definitely not going to do anything good in life.”

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Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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via Pixabay

As people get older, social isolation and loneliness become serious problems. Many find themselves living alone for the first time after the death of a spouse. It's also difficult for older people to maintain friendships when people they've known for years become ill or pass away.

Census Bureau figures say that almost a quarter of men and nearly 46% of women over the age of 75 live alone.

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