Mother of two takes a bold stance by proudly proclaiming that weed makes her a 'better mom'
via caitlinfladger / Instagram

Over the past decade or so "mommy wine" culture has blown up thanks to social media and family lifestyle bloggers. These days, mothers who sip wine to cope with the stress of parenting are celebrated instead of chastised.

You can see it everywhere from wine cups that say "mommy fuel" and films that celebrate mothers who imbibe such as 2016's "Bad Moms."


One of the reasons that drinking wine is socially acceptable for parents is that it's viewed as a classier drink than say, vodka or tequila. The same can be said for dads who drink craft beer instead of having a glass of Jack Daniels or knocking back a six-pack of Coors Light while watching the kids.

But if wine is okay for mothers, why isn't marijuana?

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Caitlin Fladager, a 25-year-old social media influencer and mother-of-two, is earning praise from fellow mothers on Instagram by taking a bold stance on a taboo topic. She believes that marijuana should be just as acceptable for mothers as a glass of wine.

Fladager lives in British Columbia, Canada where marijuana is legal for recreational use.

She promoted the idea in an Instagram post where she posed sparking a doobie by a letter board that reads: "Mom truth: Weed should be just as acceptable as a glass of wine."

View this post on Instagram
Yes, I have two kids. Yes, I smoke weed daily. ⁣ ⁣ It's so funny to my how frowned upon marijuana is. No one looks twice when a mom says she enjoys “mom juice" aka wine, after her kids are in bed. But when a mom says she smokes weed, it's a huge shock. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ I talk about this to bring awareness. I feel as not enough people talk about this. Marijuana has helped me so much, especially when it comes to being a mom. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ I have never been the most patient with my two kids. Weed makes me a better mom, as I get a good night sleep after I smoke. I wake up well rested, and with a more clear mind. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ It's okay to smoke weed after your kids go to bed. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ It's okay to smoke it to help with anxiety. Mine has been SO much better since I started smoking. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ It's okay to smoke it to gain weight. I've always been dangerously underweight. Now, I am at the healthiest weight I have ever been in my life. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ It's okay to smoke it, to help you get off medication. I was able to completely stop my anti depressants because smoking helped me so much. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ It's okay to smoke instead of drink. I used to have a problem with drinking, and my behaviour that came along with that. Weed has helped me to stop drinking so much, and to be honest, I much prefer smoking over drinking. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Marijuana is my glass of wine. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ It's my can of beer. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ It's my relaxation time. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ You can still be a kick ass mom, and smoke weed.
A post shared by Caitlin Fladager (@caitlinfladager) on Nov 11, 2019 at 6:15pm PST

The photo came with a comment where she further explained her thoughts.

Yes, I have two kids. Yes, I smoke weed daily. ⁣

⁣It's so funny to my how frowned upon marijuana is. No one looks twice when a mom says she enjoys "mom juice" aka wine, after her kids are in bed. But when a mom says she smokes weed, it's a huge shock. ⁣⁣

⁣⁣I talk about this to bring awareness. I feel as not enough people talk about this. Marijuana has helped me so much, especially when it comes to being a mom. ⁣⁣

⁣⁣I have never been the most patient with my two kids. Weed makes me a better mom, as I get a good night sleep after I smoke. I wake up well rested, and with a more clear mind. ⁣⁣

⁣⁣It's okay to smoke weed after your kids go to bed. ⁣⁣

⁣⁣It's okay to smoke it to help with anxiety. Mine has been SO much better since I started smoking. ⁣⁣

⁣⁣It's okay to smoke it to gain weight. I've always been dangerously underweight. Now, I am at the healthiest weight I have ever been in my life. ⁣⁣

⁣⁣It's okay to smoke it, to help you get off medication. I was able to completely stop my anti depressants because smoking helped me so much. ⁣⁣

⁣⁣It's okay to smoke instead of drink. I used to have a problem with drinking, and my behaviour that came along with that. Weed has helped me to stop drinking so much, and to be honest, I much prefer smoking over drinking. ⁣⁣
⁣⁣Marijuana is my glass of wine. ⁣⁣

⁣⁣It's my can of beer. ⁣⁣

⁣⁣It's my relaxation time. ⁣⁣

⁣⁣You can still be a kick ass mom, and smoke weed.

Fladger decided to come out in support of mothers who smoke pot after discussing the topic with other parents.

"I talk about my smoking openly and I recommend it when someone mentions they're stressed," she told Yahoo Lifestyle. "Younger parents usually have no problem with it, but some tell me that I have a drug problem and that marijuana is a gateway drug."

Fladger became a regular pot smoker after trying various antidepressants and mood stabilizers to treat her anxiety before realizing that marijuana worked best. She smokes it on a regular basis but never in front of her children.

"I don't get behind the wheel after I smoke," Fladager tells Yahoo Lifestyle, "and I'm not zoned out on the couch with snacks, either."

RELATED: Exhausted mom posts letter begging husband for help and every parent should read it

Her post inspired passionate and overwhelmingly positive responses on Instagram.



Being intoxicated around children is never a good idea. But for mothers who'd like to catch a buzz and relax after their kids go to sleep, marijuana is healthier than wine.

Alcohol is much more addictive than marijuana and more deadly as well. In 2014, alcohol accounted for around 90,000 deaths. Meanwhile, according to the Drug Enforcement Administration, marijuana accounted for zero.

In the end, being a parent is stressful and we shouldn't judge mothers who take a glass of wine or a hit of weed to unwind after a tough day of parenting. The real focus should be making sure that parents do so with the safety of their children and themselves as their top priority.

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Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

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Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

True

In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

1 / 12

Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

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