Miss Staten Island banned from St. Patrick's Day parade after coming out bisexual
via Change.org

The organizers of the Staten Island St. Patrick's Parade have taken heat over the past few years for excluding LGBTQ organizations from marching in the event. They're the only borough in New York City that still imposes such a ban.

"Here's the deal, it's a non-sexual identification parade and that's that," Larry Cummings, a representative for the parade's organizing committee, told the Staten Island Advance. "No, they are not marching. Don't try to keep asking a million friggin' questions, OK?"


To take a stand against bigotry, Madison L'Insalata, the 2019 Miss Staten Island, announced she was bisexual the night before Sunday's parade. She also said she would march wearing rainbow colors to represent the LGBT community.

Larry Cummings via Change.org

"There's no rule against me wearing a rainbow," said L'Insalata, 23, told The New York Post. "I want people to see the colors and ask questions."

Miss Richmond County, Gabrielle Ryan, and Miss Staten Island's Outstanding Teen, Angelica Mroczek, previously announced they would not be marching because of the ban.

"I'm proud of the community that I am from, and I'm proud to be Miss Staten Island," Madison L'Insalata said, "but I'm not going to hide who I am."

The night before the parade, Jim Smith, the director of Miss Staten Island Scholarship Pageants, informed L'Insalata that parade organizer Larry Cummings banned her from marching in the parade because of her announcement.

Smith claimed that the organizers of the parade wouldn't allow her to march for "safety reasons." Claiming that she could be subject to abuse from drunken, rowdy revelers.

"What can happen to her? I don't think anyone can harm her. I'm very disappointed, though I'm not surprised. I know they're very strong in their beliefs," Smith said of parade organizers.

But the parade organizers couldn't stop L'Insalata from attending the parade as a member of the general public.

On Sunday, she stood and watched the parade from the sidelines like the rest of her fellow Staten Island residents. But she did so while proudly wearing a rainbow scarf and heart-shaped pin while clutching a little multicolored flag.

"I still wanted to march because I felt I could make a much greater impact being in the parade, waving my rainbow flag," L'Insalata told The New York Post Sunday.

"It's frustrating — I wanted to be in the parade, and it's unfortunate we can't have a disagreement and still be in the same place," she continued. "They're removing all discussion by not allowing me to be there."

L'Insalata wasn't the only person banned from the parade for making a pro-LGBT statement.

Republican City Councilman Joseph Borelli says he was physically blocked from marching in the parade for wearing a small rainbow pin.

"They called police on me. I spoke to a sergeant and was not going to make the life of our cops more complicated to prove a point," he said. "I didn't come looking for an argument. My friends handed a pin to me. I really didn't think it was a big affront to the Irish."

Madison L'Insalata intended to make a statement by marching in the parade in support of the banned LGBT groups. However, the fact that she was banned may have amplified her message even louder.

"I said what I have to say — I still think that my message got across and that's most important," she said.

True

This year more than ever, many families are anticipating an empty dinner table. Shawn Kaplan lived this experience when his father passed away, leaving his mother who struggled to provide food for her two children. Shawn is now a dedicated volunteer and donor with Second Harvest Food Bank in Middle Tennessee and encourages everyone to give back this holiday season with Amazon.

Watch the full story:

Over one million people in Tennessee are at risk of hunger every day. And since the outbreak of COVID-19, Second Harvest has seen a 50% increase in need for their services. That's why Amazon is Delivering Smiles and giving back this holiday season by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Second Harvest to feed those hit the hardest this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local food bank or charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

via Brittany Kinley / Facebook

Brittany Kinley, a mother from Mansfield, Texas, had a hilarious mom fail her and she's chalking it up to being just another crazy thing that happened in 2020.

When Kinley filled out the order form for her son Mason's kindergarten class pictures, there was an option to have his name engraved into the photos. But Kinley wasn't interested in having her son's name on the photos so she wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" on the box.

Well, it appears as though she should have left the box blank because the computer or incredibly literal human that designed the photographs wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" where mason's name should be.

Keep Reading Show less
True

A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
popular

Funny how a 'new' male problem is a very old problem for women. Amy Poehler explains.

Not many people are brave enough to talk back to the guy who co-created "Chappelle's Show" when he says something kinda clueless. But not many people are Amy Poehler.

Men struggle to comprehend the pressures women feel. The same is true of women!

Gah! We'll never get along.

This conversation between comedian Neal Brennan and Amy Poehler is a pretty good example of how hard it can be to figure life out sometimes.

Neal, the genius who co-created "Chappelle's Show," sat down with Amy for his show "The Approval Matrix." The topic? WHAT are men supposed to be now? Cool? Adorkable? Both? Neither?

Keep Reading Show less
via UDOT / Facebook

In December 2018, The Utah Department of Transportation opened the largest wildlife overpass in the state, spanning 320 by 50 feet across all six lanes of Interstate 80.

Its construction was intended to make traveling through the I-80 corridor in Summit County safer for motorists and the local wildlife.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports that there were over 100 animal incidents on the interstate since 2016, giving the stretch of highway the unfortunate nickname of "Slaughter Row."

Keep Reading Show less