Meet the Internet's most powerful warrior against ageism: Baddie Winkle.

Her bio reads: "Stealing your man since 1928." And that's just the beginning.

Baddie Winkle is just doing Baddie Winkle.

judging you
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


Ashley Hoffmand of Styleite called this 87-year-old Kentuckian's presence online "a tonic to women who fear judgment everywhere."

selfieee!!
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

And thank heaven for that.


it's true
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


It all started with her great-granddaughter, Kennedy, who introduced Baddie to social media.

"Kennedy is responsible for all of this. Kennedy and I have a lot of fun together. We're very close ... she's my stylist. She helps me out a lot.

pre vmas!! @marinafini took this photo 💞
A photo posted by kennedy (@psychicbabe) on

Baddie and her great granddaughter Kennedy <3

"One day, I was laying out in the sun, and I put on some tie-dyed shirt and a pair of cutoff shorts of my [great-] granddaughter Kennedy's. She came home and said, 'Oh, Granny, you look so cute! Let me take a pic of you.'"

Peace and Love 🌺😏💜
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

And the rest was history!

LOVE YOU @mileycyrus 💚🌈 TUNE IN TONIGHT FOR THE VMAS ON @MTV
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

Even Miley is a fan.

The Internet was. in. love.

BLESSED
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

And can you blame us?

"I'm not an old person. I've never been an old person. I just do my thing," Baddie Winkle says.

Older people, like all human beings who fit into a certain category, are not all the same!

Grandmas can be this if they want.

Cool apron, Grandma! Image via George Eastman House/Flickr.

Or they can be this!

my back side is the best side
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


Baddie Winkle, whose real name is Helen Van Winkle, breaks the stereotype molds.

She's rocking bright colors and she's being herself.

Baddie — in all her tie-dyed, 19-year-old-great-granddaughter-collaborating glory — is so great. And at times ... especially when she's poking fun at the way the media typically shows older people ... hilarious.

life alert: caught the feels
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

LOL.

Just by having a good time and hangin' with her family, she's forcing many of us to reconsider what's "acceptable" ... not just for older folks, but for ourselves.

Let's admire her.

I LOVE @beautyconofficial 💘
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

She's not acting like anything but herself. She loves dressing up, working with her great-granddaughter, and being a role model.

"I don't like 'old women' clothes," she told Refinery29.

🍄🔮
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


And she doesn't have time for haters.


She's too busy being her.


💣📲💗
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

True individuals come in every age.

"You're only here once in your lifetime, so have fun."

Who's ready to call their grandma?

my fav person @baddiewinkle 🌙🌸🍄🌈👅
A photo posted by kennedy (@psychicbabe) on
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