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Meet the Internet's most powerful warrior against ageism: Baddie Winkle.

Her bio reads: "Stealing your man since 1928." And that's just the beginning.

Baddie Winkle is just doing Baddie Winkle.

judging you
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


Ashley Hoffmand of Styleite called this 87-year-old Kentuckian's presence online "a tonic to women who fear judgment everywhere."

selfieee!!
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

And thank heaven for that.


it's true
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


It all started with her great-granddaughter, Kennedy, who introduced Baddie to social media.

"Kennedy is responsible for all of this. Kennedy and I have a lot of fun together. We're very close ... she's my stylist. She helps me out a lot.

pre vmas!! @marinafini took this photo 💞
A photo posted by kennedy (@psychicbabe) on

Baddie and her great granddaughter Kennedy <3

"One day, I was laying out in the sun, and I put on some tie-dyed shirt and a pair of cutoff shorts of my [great-] granddaughter Kennedy's. She came home and said, 'Oh, Granny, you look so cute! Let me take a pic of you.'"

Peace and Love 🌺😏💜
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

And the rest was history!

LOVE YOU @mileycyrus 💚🌈 TUNE IN TONIGHT FOR THE VMAS ON @MTV
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

Even Miley is a fan.

The Internet was. in. love.

BLESSED
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

And can you blame us?

"I'm not an old person. I've never been an old person. I just do my thing," Baddie Winkle says.

Older people, like all human beings who fit into a certain category, are not all the same!

Grandmas can be this if they want.

Cool apron, Grandma! Image via George Eastman House/Flickr.

Or they can be this!

my back side is the best side
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


Baddie Winkle, whose real name is Helen Van Winkle, breaks the stereotype molds.

She's rocking bright colors and she's being herself.

Baddie — in all her tie-dyed, 19-year-old-great-granddaughter-collaborating glory — is so great. And at times ... especially when she's poking fun at the way the media typically shows older people ... hilarious.

life alert: caught the feels
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

LOL.

Just by having a good time and hangin' with her family, she's forcing many of us to reconsider what's "acceptable" ... not just for older folks, but for ourselves.

Let's admire her.

I LOVE @beautyconofficial 💘
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

She's not acting like anything but herself. She loves dressing up, working with her great-granddaughter, and being a role model.

"I don't like 'old women' clothes," she told Refinery29.

🍄🔮
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


And she doesn't have time for haters.


She's too busy being her.


💣📲💗
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

True individuals come in every age.

"You're only here once in your lifetime, so have fun."

Who's ready to call their grandma?

my fav person @baddiewinkle 🌙🌸🍄🌈👅
A photo posted by kennedy (@psychicbabe) on

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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This article originally appeared on 02.04.19


As much as we'd like to pretend every phrase we utter is a lone star suspended in the space of our own genius, all language has a history. Unfortunately, given humanity's aptitude for treating each other like shit, etymology is fraught with reminders of our very racist world.

Since I have faith that most of you reading want to navigate the world with intelligence and empathy, I figured it'd be useful to share some of the everyday phrases rooted in racist etymology.

Knowledge is power, and the way we use and contextualize our words can make a huge difference in the atmospheres we create.


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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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