Meet the Internet's most powerful warrior against ageism: Baddie Winkle.

Her bio reads: "Stealing your man since 1928." And that's just the beginning.

Baddie Winkle is just doing Baddie Winkle.

judging you
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


Ashley Hoffmand of Styleite called this 87-year-old Kentuckian's presence online "a tonic to women who fear judgment everywhere."

selfieee!!
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

And thank heaven for that.


it's true
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


It all started with her great-granddaughter, Kennedy, who introduced Baddie to social media.

"Kennedy is responsible for all of this. Kennedy and I have a lot of fun together. We're very close ... she's my stylist. She helps me out a lot.

pre vmas!! @marinafini took this photo 💞
A photo posted by kennedy (@psychicbabe) on

Baddie and her great granddaughter Kennedy <3

"One day, I was laying out in the sun, and I put on some tie-dyed shirt and a pair of cutoff shorts of my [great-] granddaughter Kennedy's. She came home and said, 'Oh, Granny, you look so cute! Let me take a pic of you.'"

Peace and Love 🌺😏💜
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

And the rest was history!

LOVE YOU @mileycyrus 💚🌈 TUNE IN TONIGHT FOR THE VMAS ON @MTV
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

Even Miley is a fan.

The Internet was. in. love.

BLESSED
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

And can you blame us?

"I'm not an old person. I've never been an old person. I just do my thing," Baddie Winkle says.

Older people, like all human beings who fit into a certain category, are not all the same!

Grandmas can be this if they want.

Cool apron, Grandma! Image via George Eastman House/Flickr.

Or they can be this!

my back side is the best side
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


Baddie Winkle, whose real name is Helen Van Winkle, breaks the stereotype molds.

She's rocking bright colors and she's being herself.

Baddie — in all her tie-dyed, 19-year-old-great-granddaughter-collaborating glory — is so great. And at times ... especially when she's poking fun at the way the media typically shows older people ... hilarious.

life alert: caught the feels
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

LOL.

Just by having a good time and hangin' with her family, she's forcing many of us to reconsider what's "acceptable" ... not just for older folks, but for ourselves.

Let's admire her.

I LOVE @beautyconofficial 💘
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

She's not acting like anything but herself. She loves dressing up, working with her great-granddaughter, and being a role model.

"I don't like 'old women' clothes," she told Refinery29.

🍄🔮
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


And she doesn't have time for haters.


She's too busy being her.


💣📲💗
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

True individuals come in every age.

"You're only here once in your lifetime, so have fun."

Who's ready to call their grandma?

my fav person @baddiewinkle 🌙🌸🍄🌈👅
A photo posted by kennedy (@psychicbabe) on

That first car is a rite of passage into adulthood. Specifically, the hard-earned lesson of expectations versus reality. Though some of us are blessed with Teslas at 17, most teenagers receive a car that’s been … let’s say previously loved. And that’s probably a good thing, considering nearly half of first-year drivers end up in wrecks. Might as well get the dings on the lemon, right?

Of course, wrecks aside, buying a used car might end up costing more in the long run after needing repairs, breaking down and just a general slew of unexpected surprises. But hey, at least we can all look back and laugh.

My first car, for example, was a hand-me-down Toyota of some sort from my mother. I don’t recall the specific model, but I definitely remember getting into a fender bender within the first week of having it. She had forgotten to get the brakes fixed … isn’t that a fun story?

Jimmy Fallon recently asked his “Tonight Show” audience on Twitter to share their own worst car experiences. Some of them make my brake fiasco look like cakewalk (or cakedrive, in this case). Either way, these responses might make us all feel a little less alone. Or at the very least, give us a chuckle.

Here are 22 responses with the most horsepower:

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Joy

Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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TikTok about '80s childhood is a total Gen X flashback.

As a Gen X parent, it's weird to try to describe my childhood to my kids. We're the generation that didn't grow up with the internet or cell phones, yet are raising kids who have never known a world without them. That difference alone is enough to make our 1980s childhoods feel like a completely different planet, but there are other differences too that often get overlooked.

How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

And '80s hair? With the feathered bangs and the terrible perms and the crunchy hair spray? What, why and how?

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