Lady Gaga's dog-walker is recovering after assailants shot him and stole her two French bulldogs
via Chairman of the joint Chiefs of Staff / Flickr and Valley of the Dogs / Instagram

Ryan Fischer, 30, was shot last night in West Hollywood, California while walking three of Oscar- and Grammy-winner Lady Gaga's dogs. He was taken to the hospital in critical condition and according to The New York Post is, "thankfully recovering well."

After the shooting, the suspects stole two of Gaga's French Bulldogs Gustavo and Koji. A third bulldog belonging to the singer, Miss Asia, ran away from the scene and was later recovered by law enforcement.

Steve, a friend of the victim, told FOX 11 that Fisher was passionate about the dogs.


"I haven't heard from him yet. I heard that he was shot four times in the chest last night and I just tried to go to the hospital but they weren't accepting visitors," Steve said. "He would die a take a bullet for those dogs. He loves those dogs unconditionally. He's always with them 24/7."

Authorities have yet to disclose the number of times Fischer was shot.

When the news reached Lady Gaga she was in Rome getting ready to shoot an upcoming movie. She's so distraught over the shooting she has offered a $500,000 "No questions asked" reward for their return.

According to the LAPD, the suspects got out of a white Nissan Altima with tinted windows, and one of them opened fire on Fischer. The two suspects then grabbed the dogs, jumped back into the car, and fled the scene. It's unknown whether the suspects knew the dogs belong to the superstar.

Lady Gaga and her dogs are sure to make the headlines, but we mustn't lose sight of the victim. Fischer was originally from Cincinnati, Ohio, and according to social media feeds, spent a lot of time in New York City. He was gunned down near his current home in West Hollywood.

Photos and videos on his Instagram page show him to be a true dog lover. He talks to them as if they were his own children and he's clearly an experienced trainer.

A recent post by Fischer shows that he's not only interested in his favorite pups' development as pets but as spiritual beings as well. Here he is talking to the dogs about the importance of Ash Wednesday.

"No matter who you are - from human to hound - the tradition of setting aside time to contemplate your life and role in it is essential in the development of self," he writes in the caption.


Here's a super sweet video Fischer recently made for Lady Gaga's birthday featuring her dogs.


While the motive for the dognappers is unknown, it may have been financial. The LAPD told The Daily Mail that French Bulldogs can go for "as much as $10,000 if they have pedigree lineage."

Lady Gaga adopted Miss Asia in 2014. Koji was born in 2015 and Gustavo a year after that.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via CNN / Twitter

Eviction seemed imminent for Dasha Kelly, 32, and her three young daughters Sharron, 8; Kia, 6; and Imani, 5, on Monday. The eviction moratorium expired over the weekend and it looked like there was no way for them to avoid becoming homeless.

The former Las Vegas card dealer lost her job due to casino closures during the pandemic and needed $2,000 to cover her back rent. The mother of three couldn't bear the thought of being put out of her apartment with three children in the scorching Nevada desert.

"I had no idea what we were going to do," Kelly said, according to KOAT.

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