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I'm so used to TV personalities making excuses for offensive segments that I didn't expect this.

Don't you hate it when someone you respect acts in a way that seems to go against who you thought they were? Me too. I've watched Melissa Harris-Perry's program for a quite a while, and I was genuinely surprised and somewhat disappointed when the commentary on a recent show turned to mocking a family that was partly formed through transracial adoption, just as mine was. It happened to be a political family, but that doesn't change anything. Harris-Perry didn't make the disparaging remarks, but she did laugh along with the commentators, and she didn't speak up. (You can watch the original clip; it's linked right below the video here.) This kind of apology — you know, a real one — is what we should see when someone makes a mistake. 'Cause we're all human, and humans mess up.

I'm so used to TV personalities making excuses for offensive segments that I didn't expect this.

You can also watch the original clip, for which she apologized.

SOURCE: iSTOCK

Usually the greatest fear after a wild night of partying isn't what you said that you might regret, but how you'll look in your friends' tagged photos. Although you left the house looking like a 10, those awkward group selfies make you feel more like a 5, prompting you to wonder, "Why do I look different in pictures?"

It's a weird phenomenon that, thanks to selfies, is making people question their own mirrors. Are pictures the "real" you or is it your reflection? Have mirrors been lying to us this whole time??

The answer to that is a bit tricky. The good news is that there's a big chance that Quasimodo-looking creature that stares back at you in your selfies isn't an accurate depiction of the real you. But your mirror isn't completely truthful either.

Below, a scientific breakdown that might explain those embarrassing tagged photos of you:

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