Hilarious sketch makes a good point: Teachers should be treated like the heroes they are.

What would it be like if the world treated star teachers the way we treat star athletes?

Thanks to a spot-on parody of "SportsCenter" by Comedy Central's "Key & Peele," now we know exactly what that world would look like. And it's awesome.

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to "TeachingCenter"!


GIFs via "Key & Peele."

We live in a society where athletes are one of the most common role models for kids.

And there's nothing wrong with that. In fact, some athletes make great role models — especially when they share messages of hard work, staying in school, and giving back to your community. Other athletes, well, maybe not so much.

The "TeachingCenter" sketch imagines a world where the question "What do you want to be when you grow up?" can be answered with: "A teacher!"

Take this clip from the teachers' "draft" featuring superstar calculus teacher Mike Yoast:

"His father living paycheck-to-paycheck as a humble pro football player — the kid was a natural mathlete."

Joking aside, the sketch makes a great point: Teachers should be treated like the heroes they are.

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids every day. While star athletes might make tens of millions of dollars in a single season, teachers get by on a far more modest salary while contributing so much to the success of our world's future.

On top of that, teachers' work can be pretty thankless at times.

While it's unlikely to see teachers landing endorsement deals anytime soon, we can — and should — thank them for the impact they have on our kids' lives.


Make it rain, teach. Make it rain.

Check out the hilarious sketch below.

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As part of its promise for a brighter world, Dole is partnering with Bye Bye Plastic Bags's efforts to bring sunshine to all.

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Heather Cox Richardson didn't set out to build a fan base when she started her daily "Letters from an American." The Harvard-educated political historian and Boston College professor had actually just been stung by a yellow-jacket as she was leaving on a trip from her home in Maine to teach in Boston last fall when she wrote her first post.

Since she's allergic to bees, she decided to stay put and see how badly her body would react. With some extra time on her hands, she decided to write something on her long-neglected Facebook page. It was September of 2019, and Representative Adam Schiff had just sent a letter to the Director of National Intelligence stating that the House knew there was a whistleblower complaint, the DNI wasn't handing it over, and that wasn't legal.

"I recognized, because I'm a political historian, that this was the first time that a member of Congress had found a specific law that they were accusing a specific member of the executive branch of violating," Richardson told Bill Moyers in an interview in July. "So I thought, you know, I oughta put that down, 'cause this is a really important moment. If you knew what you were looking for, it was a big moment. So I wrote it down..."

By the time she got to Boston she has a deluge of questions from people about what she'd written.

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As part of its promise for a brighter world, Dole is partnering with Bye Bye Plastic Bags's efforts to bring sunshine to all.

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Crest

Some of the moments that make us smile the most have come from everyday superstars, like The McClure twins!

Everyone could use a little morning motivation, so Crest – the #1 Toothpaste Brand in America – is teaming up with some popular digital all-stars to share their smile-worthy, positivity-filled (virtual) pep talks for this year's back-to-school season!

As part of this campaign, Crest is donating toothpaste to Feeding America to unleash even more smiles for families who need it the most.

Let's encourage confident smiles this back-to-school season. Check out the McClure Twins back-to-school pep talk above!

Photo by Charl Folscher on Unsplash

Harvard historian Donald Yacovone didn't set out to write the book he's writing. His plan was to write about the legacy of the antislavery movement and the rise of the Civil Rights era, but as he delved into his research, he ran into something that changed the focus of his book completely: Old school history textbooks.

Now the working title of his book is: "Teaching White Supremacy: The Textbook Battle Over Race in American History."

The first book that caught his attention was an 1832 textbook written Noah Webster—as in Merriam-Webster's Dictionary—called "History of the United States." Yacovone, a 2013 recipient of Harvard's W.E.B. Du Bois medal—the university's highest award for African American studies—told the Harvard Gazette about his discovery:

"In Webster's book there was next to nothing about the institution of slavery, despite the fact that it was a central American institution. There were no African Americans ever mentioned. When Webster wrote about Africans, it was extremely derogatory, which was shocking because those comments were in a textbook. What I realized from his book, and from the subsequent ones, was how they defined 'American' as white and only as white. Anything that was less than an Anglo Saxon was not a true American. The further along I got in this process, the more intensely this sentiment came out. I realized that I was looking at, there's no other word for it, white supremacy. I came across one textbook that declared on its first page, 'This is the White Man's History.' At that point, you had to be a dunce not to see what these books were teaching."

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