From pedicures to lawn mowing, these 13 dads remind us what parenting is all about.

There's something special about the bond dads have with their daughters.

There's often a misconception that dudes only want to raise tiny dudes. Now more men are styling their daughters' hair, understanding the difference between leggings and jeggings, attending dance recitals, and just being whatever their daughters need them to be. This shouldn't be surprising. It's called parenting.


NFL dad doing dad things. GIF via xoNecole from Pantene/YouTube.

Best of all, their daughters benefit greatly from it. Studies have shown that daughters with involved fathers tend to have more confidence, are more self-reliant, and are more successful in school and business than ones who don't.

Put simply, dads can be really important, especially when it comes to raising little girls.

With that in mind, here are 13 photos showing how some dads interact with their young daughters in their own ways. (All photos were taken from the Daddy Doin' Work Instagram feed and are used with permission.)

1. Dads are there for their daughters. Even when they come into the world a little earlier than expected.

Wait till you get to #13 for a extra-special bonus picture.

2. Dads teach their daughters that "bro time" with other dads is a lot more fun when they're around.

3. Dads know how to make it rain for their daughters. Especially when they want to test out their new umbrellas.

4. Dads teach their daughters that the "damsel in distress" thing is nonsense. Girls have the power to do anything they put their minds to. Including fixing stuff.

5. Dads teach their daughters that they have them covered if they need anything. Even if that "something" is lip gloss at a basketball game.

6. Some dads teach their daughters that being a true hero means protecting other peoples' kids as well.

7. Dads teach their daughters that hair is optional when they want to open up the salon for business.

8. Dads teach their daughters that bonding moments are not gender-specific.

9. Dads teach their daughters that they'll always try to make them feel safe.

10. Dads know that they will be the first male role model their daughters get to meet.

11. Dads have fun ways of showing their daughters the value of doing chores.

12. Dads teach their daughters that there's nothing more important than family. Even when not all of its members are connected by blood.

13. And when those babies arrive in the world a little earlier than expected (remember #1 on this list), dads know that their love will help them grow stronger.

Little boys are awesome (I know because I used to be one), but the bond that a dad has with his daughters (speaking for myself, at least) is a powerful one. Much love to the men who put in the work to ensure their little girls grow up to become strong women. And also to all the other parents out there doing the heavy lifting that don't fit into the dad category.

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Mozilla
True
Firefox

When I found out I was pregnant in October 2018, I had planned to keep the news a secret from family for a little while — but my phone seemed to have other ideas.

Within just a few hours of finding out the news, I was being bombarded with ads for baby gear, baby clothes and diapers on Facebook, Instagram and pretty much any other site I visited — be it my phone or on my computer.

Good thing my family wasn't looking over my shoulder while I was on my phone or my secret would have been ruined.

I'm certainly not alone in feeling like online ads can read your mind.

When I started asking around, it seemed like everyone had their own similar story: Brian Kelleher told me that when he and his wife met, they started getting ads for wedding rings and bridal shops within just a few weeks. Tech blogger Snezhina Piskov told me that she started getting ads for pocket projectors after discussing them in Messenger with her colleagues. Meanwhile Lauren Foley, a writer, told me she started getting ads for Happy Socks after seeing one of their shops when she got off the bus one day.

When online advertising seems to know us this well, it begs the question: are our phones listening to us?

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via Good Humor and the Library of Congress

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