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Each bouquet from Hello Flowers has a secret — job training for people who need it most.

We see lots of images of beautiful bouquets online, but these have a gorgeous story behind them, too.

Each bouquet from Hello Flowers has a secret — job training for people who need it most.
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By simply following her bliss, Annie Cheong found an entirely new calling in life.

All images via Hello Flowers, used with permission.


Annie always enjoyed taking floral arranging classes as a hobby away from her job in social work.

But one day it hit her: What if she combined the two?

She was passionate about both, and knowing a fellow social worker who trained low-income women in floral arrangement gave her the final push to see what would happen if she tried. She decided she was going to pursue a career that combined the good-for-the-world vibes of social work with her passion for flowers. So she started her own flower-arranging business.

Annie founded Hello Flowers, which partners with social service agencies and volunteer groups to provide on-the-job training and ad-hoc employment to people who need it.

The results have been amazing.

Scrolling through images of weddings, you'd have no idea this came from a company that's helping and empowering their employees in such a cool way. But each of these bouquets has an amazing story of helping people in need find a flexible way to get back to work.

From a seemingly small pursuit, Annie's personal passion for flower arranging was about to become a business. Not just any business, but a business with a purpose. A business that made money (of course!) but that also made its community just a little bit better.

The Hello Flowers Facebook page shows just how huge an impact she's had on others — both in her business and for the social good of her community.

Hello Flowers has been tagged and featured on multiple wedding posts. It's so amazing to see these gorgeous wedding bouquets and know that HelloFlowers' bouquets have such an amazing backstory.

Additionally, they're not shy about how much community outreach matters to them. This past Mother's Day, their proceeds went toward just that.

"By giving your best in everything that you have committed to at any point of time, then you should have no regrets," Annie told Asian Entrepreneur.

It's safe to say Annie's not only giving her best, but she's bringing out the best in others.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.