The 'hottest thing you can do' on a dating app right now is to say you're vaccinated
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The world of online dating is competitive. Single people have to use every advantage they can to make themselves more attractive than the next person being swiped through. Right now, one of the best ways to stand out is to let the world know that either you've been vaccinated or intend to be.

It makes sense, who in the world wants to go out on a date and come back with COVID-19?

"Yeah, I had a great date with Eddie. The problem is the next day I lost my sense of smell."

An OkCupid spokesperson told the New York Times that those who claim to have been vaccinated are being liked at double the rate of those who've said they aren't interested.


"Basically," he said, "getting the vaccine is the hottest thing you could be doing on a dating app right now."

A Tinder spokesperson told Vice that the site has seen a 238% increase in the mention of vaccines in user bios, noting "a significant increase starting in November 2020 and continuing to rise in December."

After OkCupid added the question "will you get the Covid-19 vaccine?" to its platform, it saw that those who answered "yes" get 13% more likes from potential partners.

Forty percent of Millennials and Generation Z say they would cancel the first date with someone if they said they had no intention of getting vaccinated. That number jumps to 80% when they're members of the LGBT community.

Being fully vaccinated also means that you can date other fully-vaccinated people without having to worry. According to the latest CDC guidelines, the fully-vaccinated can "gather indoors with fully vaccinated people without wearing a mask."

Because let's face it, masks may be safe but they aren't very sexy unless, of course, you have a thing for people with partially-obscured faces.

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Aside from the practical health considerations of meeting someone in the COVID-19 era, learning someone's opinions on vaccines is a great way to know what they're really about.

"It potentially signals people's approach to health care, to their relationship, to science, their trust, and expertise," Sociology professor Jennifer Reich, told ABC.

"It can signal a lot of other kinds of things that might be an indication of whether someone shares some of your values and perceptions about things like their relationships, their community, and their personal lifestyle," said Reich added.

The fact that getting vaccinated makes people more appealing may have a positive effect on the overall vaccination rate. If refusing to get vaccinated begins limiting people's ability to hook up, they may just decide to get a shot in order to improve their sex life.

"I guess from a public health perspective, dating apps could help win the war on the virus, because people will go: if I want to date somebody, then I better be vaccinated," Ivo Vlaev, professor of behavioral science at Warwick Business School in England, told Insider. "The more governments and other organizations require vaccination status, the more we are going to require from each other."

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less