Beyoncé just wrote a big check to HBCUs after an earth-shattering Coachella set.

Look at this.  

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Coachella.

I mean....

A literal. Queen.

Photo by Larry Busacca/Getty Images for Coachella.

Beyoncé Giselle Knowles-Carter, ruler of pop music and your favorite Southern-raised do-gooder (OK, my favorite), just made a huge announcement.    

After a historic, legendary performance as the first black woman to headline a Coachella festival, Beyoncé announced a $100,000 donation to students at historically black college and universities (HBCUs).  

GIF via “Flavor of Love.”

(Yeah, that was our reaction, too.)

This news is especially amazing, given how significant HBCUs are to the story of civil rights in the U.S.

HBCUs are institutions of higher education that were established to serve African-Americans before the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

As a part of her philanthropic BeyGOOD initiative, Beyoncé will donate $25,000 to four HBCUs as part of the Homecoming Scholars Award Program. One student from each HBCU ― Bethune-Cookman University, Tuskegee University, Wilberforce University, and Xavier University of Louisiana — will receive the money.  

“We salute the rich legacy of Historically Black Colleges and Universities,” Ivy McGregor, Director of Philanthropy and Corporate Relations at Parkwood Entertainment which houses BeyGOOD said in a statement. “We honor all institutions of higher learning for maintaining culture and creating environments for optimal learning which expands dreams and the seas of possibilities for students.”    

Maybe the coolest part? The gift is on theme. Beyoncé’s Coachella performance was dedicated to HBCUs and their unparalleled legacy of black culture. Beyoncé was joined by performers from marching bands and majorettes styled to reflect those from HBCUs.    

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Coachella.

And of course, Bey was immediately and deservedly praised for putting on such a public display of respect for HBCUs at a predominately white concert.

Lest we forget, this certainly isn’t Beyoncé’s only example of her dedication to black excellence and scholarship.

After launching the visual album “Lemonade,” she created the BeyGood’s Formation Scholars Awards Program, which provided scholarship money to young women studying creative arts, music, literature or African-American studies at Berklee College of Music; Howard University; and Howard’s Parsons School of Design.

Through programs like this, she continues to amplify black education, women, and unique voices in her artistry — and it shows in her work.    

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for NARAS.

As HBCUs struggle to secure the funding necessary to maintain their important place in society, Beyoncé’s public and financial support is a welcome display of dedication to black culture. HBCU students will likely appreciate it.

To qualify for the award, applicants must maintain a 3.5 GPA or above. Universities will select all finalists and winners, and winners will be announced in the summer. To learn more, check out the program here.

Most Shared
Photo by Hunters Race on Unsplash

If you're a woman and you want to be a CEO, you should probably think about changing your name to "Jeffrey" or "Michael." Or possibly even "Michael Jeffreys" or "Jeffrey Michaels."

According to Fortune, last year, more men named Jeffrey and Michael became CEOs of America's top companies than women. A whopping total of one woman became a CEO, while two men named Jeffrey took the title, and two men named Michael moved into the C-suite as well.

The "New CEO Report" for 2018, which looks at new CEOS for the 250 largest S&P 500 companies, found that 23 people were appointed to the position of CEO. Only one of those 23 people was a woman. Michelle Gass, the new CEO of Kohl's, was the lone female on the list.

Keep Reading Show less
popular

Netflix

How much of what we do is influenced by what we see on TV? When it comes to risky behavior, Netflix isn't taking any chances.

After receiving a lot of heat, the streaming platform is finally removing a controversial scenedepicting teen suicide in season one of "13 Reasons Why. The decision comes two years after the show's release after statistics reveal an uptick in teen suicide.

"As we prepare to launch season three later this summer, we've been mindful about the ongoing debate around the show. So on the advice of medical experts, including Dr. Christine Moutier, Chief Medical Officer at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, we've decided with creator Brian Yorkey and the producers to edit the scene in which Hannah takes her own life from season one," Netflix said in a statement, per The Hollywood Reporter.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture

At Trump's 'Social Media Summit' on Thursday, he bizarrely claimed Arnold Schwarzenegger had 'died' and he had witnessed said death. Wait, what?!


He didn't mean it literally - thank God. You can't be too sure! After all, he seemed to think that Frederick Douglass was still alive in February. More recently, he described a world in which the 1770s included airports. His laissez-faire approach to chronology is confusing, to say the least.

Keep Reading Show less
Democracy

Words matter. And they especially matter when we are talking about the safety and well-being of children.

While the #MeToo movement has shed light on sexual assault allegations that have long been swept under the rug, it has also brought to the forefront the language we use when discussing such cases. As a writer, I appreciate the importance of using varied wording, but it's vital we try to remain as accurate as possible in how we describe things.

There can be gray area in some topics, but some phrases being published by the media regarding sexual predation are not gray and need to be nixed completely—not only because they dilute the severity of the crime, but because they are simply inaccurate by definition.

One such phrase is "non-consensual sex with a minor." First of all, non-consensual sex is "rape" no matter who is involved. Second of all, most minors legally cannot consent to sex (the age of consent in the U.S. ranges by state from 16 to 18), so sex with a minor is almost always non-consensual by definition. Call it what it is—child rape or statutory rape, depending on circumstances—not "non-consensual sex."

Keep Reading Show less
Culture