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Angelina Jolie Pitt had another major elective surgery but wants you to know you don't have to.

In 2013, Angelina Jolie Pitt underwent a double mastectomy after learning she carried a mutated gene often linked with breast and ovarian cancer. In her March 2015 New York Times op-ed, Angelina revealed she recently underwent another preventative cancer surgery, electing to have her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed. While her story is a brave and touching one, her words for other women who are concerned about their risk of developing cancer speak volumes.

It's important for women to know there are a variety of options available when it comes to dealing with cancer and taking preventative measures if you're at risk for cancer. Angelina's willingness to share her experience is not only brave, but could possibly save lives and comfort women who are worried about their own health.


While her 2013 op-ed on her double mastectomy made news around the world, there are still plenty of women who don't know early cancer screenings are available. And, sadly, the medical industry continues to be incredibly biased toward women, often with giving them higher insurance premiums and fewer opportunities for clinal trials. That's why a huge celebrity who is encouraging women to explore their options and make decisions they feel comfortable with for their bodies is such a big deal. Not to mention, it's also pretty cool to hear a beautiful and confident woman talking about her health and body in such an open and honest way.

One concern raised after Angelina wrote about her double mastectomy that no doubt will surface again with her latest piece was that many women can't afford screening to identify the BRCA1 gene, and even those who can can't always afford surgery or treatment. That's why I think it's important that Angelina noted that there are a variety of options when it comes to preventative cancer care. Feminist organizer and writer Erin Matson summed up this sentiment quite perfectly on Twitter:

My hope is that by making this information more widely available, perhaps more women will demand these tests become more accessible for women of all economic backgrounds and maybe insurance companies will get on board to provide coverage for these screenings.

Angelina went on to say that choosing to have surgery does not make her feel less feminine or less of a woman, which I think is also a powerful note.

Women are not the sum of their body parts. Ovaries don't make a woman. Breasts don't make a woman. Being a woman makes a woman. So it's quite beautiful that Angelina not only used her platform to educate women about their health care options, but shared that her surgeries have not changed who she is. It's important to challenge the idea so many people still subscribe to that femininity and womanhood are reliant on body parts instead of who you are and how you feel about yourself. I'm proud of Angelina Jolie Pitt for using her influence in such a positive way while also acknowledging her privilege and attempting to use it for the benefit of others. Here's hoping this important conversation helps others make more informed decisions about the care they want and need.

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From the time she was a little girl, Abby Recker loved helping people. Her parents kept her stocked up with first-aid supplies so she could spend hours playing with her dolls, making up stories of ballet injuries and carefully wrapping “broken” arms and legs.

Recker fondly describes her hometown of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, as a simple place where people are kind to one another. There’s even a term for it—“Iowa nice”—describing an overall sense of agreeableness and emotional trust shown by people who are otherwise strangers.

Abby | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Driven by passion and the encouragement of her parents, Recker attended nursing school, graduating just one year before the unthinkable happened: a global pandemic. One year into her career as an emergency and labor and delivery nurse, everything she thought she knew about the medical field got turned upside down. That period of time was tough on everyone, and Nurse Recker was no exception.

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via Pexels

The Emperor of the Seas.

Imagine retiring early and spending the rest of your life on a cruise ship visiting exotic locations, meeting interesting people and eating delectable food. It sounds fantastic, but surely it’s a billionaire’s fantasy, right?

Not according to Angelyn Burk, 53, and her husband Richard. They’re living their best life hopping from ship to ship for around $44 a night each. The Burks have called cruise ships their home since May 2021 and have no plans to go back to their lives as landlubbers. Angelyn took her first cruise in 1992 and it changed her goals in life forever.

“Our original plan was to stay in different countries for a month at a time and eventually retire to cruise ships as we got older,” Angelyn told 7 News. But a few years back, Angelyn crunched the numbers and realized they could start much sooner than expected.

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It takes a special type of person to become a nurse. The job requires a combination of energy, empathy, clear mind, oftentimes a strong stomach, and a cheerful attitude. And while people typically think of nursing in a clinical setting, some nurses are driven to work with the people that feel forgotten by society.

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Art can be a powerful unifier. With just the right lyric, image or word, great art can soften those hard lines that divide us, helping us to remember the immense value of human connection and compassion.

This is certainly the case with “Pasoori,” a Pakistani pop song that has not only become an international hit, it’s managed to bring the long divided peoples of India and Pakistan together in the name of love. Or at least in the name of good music.
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Dr. Alicia Jeffrey-Thomas teaches you how to pee.

A pelvic floor doctor from Boston, Massachusetts, has caused a stir by explaining that something we all thought was good for our health can cause real problems. In a video that has more than 5.8 million views on TikTok, Dr. Alicia Jeffrey-Thomas says we shouldn’t go pee “just in case.”

How could this be? The moment we all learned to control our bladders we were also taught to pee before going on a car trip, sitting down to watch a movie or playing sports.

The doctor posted the video as a response to TikTok user Sidneyraz, who made a video urging people to go to the bathroom whenever they get the chance. Sidneyraz is known for posting videos about things he didn’t learn until his 30s. "If you think to yourself, 'I don't have to go,' go." SidneyRaz says in the video. It sounds like common sense but evidently, he was totally wrong, just like the rest of humanity.

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