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A young girl is not letting the death of her father slow her down. Not one bit.

With college costs up and access to it being even more of a challenge, lots of people are being left out of the loop. But The College Board came up with a snazzy way to attract students to help them get ahead.

A young girl is not letting the death of her father slow her down. Not one bit.

DISCLAIMER: We were not paid to promote this, I just thought that this girl's story was great and the idea of making AP classes more accessible to women and people of color is important to me. Cool, let's dive in.

The College Board launched a new ad campaign called "All In," which promotes the benefits of taking advanced placement (AP) classes.

They've got a huge goal — to get every single qualified student enrolled in AP classes. Their latest ad follows Luhit Recinos, a senior taking two AP classes at her high school in Miami. But Luhit's not a model student. Her story stood out to the producers because she spoke candidly about her obstacles while admitting that she doesn't like to study.


Rada Film Group, a company that produced the ads with The College Board, explained:

"We wanted to target the students who were on the fence about enrolling in advanced placement ... students who were, in fact, unexceptional. In other words, we wanted these students to be relatable and identifiable because you don't have to be exceptional to take AP." — Rada Film Group

AP classes actually helped Luhit focus after dealing with an even larger challenge in her life, the death of her father.

"I never thought my father was gonna die at such a young age. ... Something that my father always wanted to do is have a job that wasn't so hard on him. It's difficult not having an education." — Luhit Recinos

Luhit and her dad

While family is important to her, Luhit learned that they can't always be with you. So focusing on school and pushing herself to take advanced classes made sense. "At least your education comes with you. Your education is part of you," she said.

Students can apply the credit that they receive from these advanced classes towards college.

But that's not the only reason why Luhit's taking them. She plans to be a psychologist and thinks the critical thinking skills she's learning will help her win at life.

"AP classes are a challenge. But if you know what you're worth, then go get what you're worth." — Luhit Recinos


The College Board hopes to reach more students like Luhit with its new All In campaign.

Young women and students of color are on their radar. Currently "only three out of 10 African-American students with potential for success in an AP science course enroll [but] a single AP class can change the educational trajectory of a student's educational career," says Rada Film Group.

They predict that in three years, "new AP courses will reach over 9,000 low-income students, and over 500 STEM classes will be developed to encourage women and minorities to excel in math and science. That is elevating 9,000 students with the opportunity to contribute substantially to the economy in ways they may not have achieved."

It looks like Luhit's on the fast track to greatness.

To learn more about her story and the All In campaign, check out the video below:

And if you're a student (or know one) who wants more info on AP classes, jump on it! Talk to teachers or guidance counselors. Here are some handy tips to get started.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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This article originally appeared on 06.28.21


After Ahmaud Arbery, an unarmed Black man, was pursued and shot by three white residents while jogging through a Georgia suburb, Ellen and Patrick Miller* of San Diego hung a Black Lives Matter flag in front of their house. It was a small gesture, but something tangible they could do.

Like many people, they wanted to both support the BLM movement and bring awareness about racism to members of their community. Despite residing in a part of the county notoriously rumored to be marred by white supremacists and their beliefs, their neighbors didn't say much about it—at first.

Recently, though, during a short window when both Ellen and Patrick were out of the house, someone sliced the flag in two and left the remains in their yard.

via Paula Fitzgibbons

They were upset, but not surprised.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."