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A troll demanded a Muslim man show examples of 'Christian terrorists.' He delivered.

'I know such acts don't represent Christ because I've studied Christ from Christians, not from anti-Christians. Learn Islam from Muslims, not from anti-Muslim bigots.'

A troll demanded a Muslim man show examples of 'Christian terrorists.' He delivered.

According to an FBI analysis of every U.S. terrorist attack between 1980 and 2005, 94% were carried out by someone who was not Muslim.

And yet, the number of anti-Muslim groups in the U.S. tripled between 2015 and 2016, as a seemingly ever-increasing segment of the population has convinced themselves that "terrorist" is synonymous with "Muslim."

Anti-Muslim protesters at Denver's "March Against Sharia" oppose the implementation of Sharia law in the U.S. — something that literally nobody is trying to do, so ... uh .... Photo by Ross Taylor/Getty Images.


Author and attorney Qasim Rashid had just about enough of this harmful and incorrect connection.

When challenged by someone on Twitter to "show [him] the Christian terrorist attacks" — thinking he'd just backed Rashid into a corner — Rashid delivered an epic history lesson.

Then he tweeted the messages:

Rashid's list of examples was so long it takes four screenshots just to fit them all in.

Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army, Christian militias in the Central African Republic, white supremacist and religious groups in the U.S., anti-abortion terrorist Robert Dear, 1996 Olympics bomber Eric Rudolph, and a host of others make up Rashid's list of Christian terrorists.

It's in the very last paragraph that Rashid really drives his point home.

"I know such acts don't represent Christ because I've studied Christ from Christians, not from anti-Christians," he writes. "Learn Islam from Muslims, not from anti-Muslim bigots."

Unlike the person who reached out to him demanding examples of non-Muslim terrorists, Rashid knows that while the people and groups he listed may have identified as Christian, they do not reflect their entire religion — just as Muslim terrorists do not represent all Muslims or all of Islam.

And that really should be a lesson for everyone about projecting the actions of an individual onto an entire group: Whether it's profiling on the basis of race, gender, religion, or anything else, it's not only wrong, it makes us less safe.

So next time you hear someone say, "Not all Muslims are terrorists, but all terrorists are Muslim," there's a perfect response waiting right here.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

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La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

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When the Soviet Union invaded Lithuania in June of 1940, scores of Jews flooded the Japanese consulate, seeking transit visas to be able to escape to a safety through Japan. Overwhelmed by the requests, Sugihara reached out to the foreign ministry in Tokyo for guidance and was told that no one without proper paperwork should be issued a visa—a limitation that would have ruled out nearly all of the refugees seeking his help.

Sugihara faced a life-changing choice. He could obey the government and leave the Jews in Lithuania to their fate, or he could disobey orders and face disgrace and the loss of his job, if not more severe punishments from his superiors.

According to the Jewish Virtual Library, Sugihara was fond of saying, "I may have to disobey my government, but if I don't, I would be disobeying God." Sugihara decided it was worth it to risk his livelihood and good standing with the Japanese government to give the Jews at his doorstep a fighting chance, so he started issuing Japanese transit visas to any refugee who needed one, regardless of their eligibility.

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