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A loving dad started a business to help his son with autism and empower others like him.

"I never expected how important what we were doing was — beyond us."

A loving dad started a business to help his son with autism and empower others like him.
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Here's a pretty jarring stat: Up to 90% of adults with autism are either unemployed or underemployed.

Being on the autism spectrum shouldn’t equate to being unemployable, and certainly individuals like actor Mickey Rowe and professor, best-selling author, and livestock consultant Temple Grandin have spoken about successfully finding a place in the career world. But this inclusivity takes a lot of educating of others about the unique way their brains work. What if we created a more supportive environment in which individuals with autism could thrive?

Luckily, one loving father discovered a simple idea to address this issue and empower not only his son, but other adults with autism. And it's pretty awesome.


When you pull into Rising Tide Car Wash, you might notice two things: Most of the employees have autism, and they are busier than ever. A Starbucks original series.

Posted by Upworthy on Monday, September 19, 2016

John D'Eri has always wanted what's best for his son, Andrew.

He didn't start out with a full understanding of the intricacies of Andrew's autism, though. Initially, he found the disorder confusing and even hoped Andrew would eventually outgrow it or that someone would find a miracle cure.

Then, as Andrew got older, John had an eye-opening revelation.

"I started to realize that Andrew is who Andrew is. And I started to look at Andrew not as a 15-year-old. I looked at him as a 40-year-old. And that really started to change my whole thought pattern. He's not gonna be independent unless I can help him to be so."

Naturally, the next question on John's mind was, "Well, what can Andrew do?"

All images via Starbucks.

Inspiration struck John one fine day at a car wash.

After brainstorming a few business ideas, John found himself intrigued by the busy back-and-forth going on as he waited for his car to get cleaned at a car wash.

All of a sudden, John had a lightbulb moment. He remembers thinking, "Andrew can do this back-end process, without a doubt."

Soon after, the plan for Rising Tide Car Wash was put in motion.

With the help of his other son, Tom, John made the dream a reality and formed a team of passionate individuals who wanted to be a part of something special.

Today, business is booming  — because the employees are thriving.

Rising Tide places great importance on maximizing the potential of each and every person on their staff. No doubt the move has paid off in spades.

"What I like about Rising Tide is that they help me [with] how to stay professional, how to talk to customers. I have friends here now that care about me, that care about reaching my goals," said employee Sean Gervil. "Actions speak louder than words. You let your actions show that you want the job. I was just surprised. I can't believe I have a job now at Rising Tide."

Rising Tide is now averaging 17,000 cars a month and is on its way to opening a second location. Talk about a success!

This is the kind of forward thinking that can make a real difference in the community.

John said, "I never expected how important what we were doing was — beyond us."

When we recognize what others are capable of and do what we can to bring out the very best in them, truly amazing things can happen. Here's to more Rising Tide locations and more game-changing ideas!

Simon & Garfunkel's song "Bridge Over Troubled Water" has been covered by more than 50 different musical artists, from Aretha Franklin to Elvis Presley to Willie Nelson. It's a timeless classic that taps into the universal struggle of feeling down and the comfort of having someone to lift us up. It's beloved for its soothing melody and cathartic lyrics, and after a year of pandemic challenges, it's perhaps more poignant now than ever.

A few years a go, American singer-songwriter Yebba Smith shared a solo a capella version of a part of "Bridge Over Troubled Water," in which she just casually sits and sings it on a bed. It's an impressive rendition on its own, highlighting Yebba's soulful, effortless voice.

But British singer Jacob Collier recently added his own layered harmony tracks to it, taking the performance to a whole other level.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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