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A homeless dad needed help. The Internet stepped up to give it to him.

"I love you all. You're like family to me right now."

A homeless dad needed help. The Internet stepped up to give it to him.

You may have seen this story about a single father who became homeless by a twist of fate after moving his 2-year-old son halfway across the country for a better life.

James lined up a job and housing before the move, but upon landing in Denver, he got the unexpected news that his housing had fallen through. He had nowhere to live.

After moving halfway across the country to provide for his son, James was suddenly unable to provide one of the most basic necessities.


He told his story to philanthropist and motivational speaker Leon Logothetis, who met James during his #GoBeKind campaign, which he created to provoke a chain of kind acts across the country.

The video of James' story quickly made its way onto major news sites, including The Huffington Post, FOX 31, and ABC 7. It was clear in the video how much Leon's gift — a $1,000 Visa gift card and a week's stay at a local hotel — touched the single father.

But the kindness of one stranger was just the beginning for James and his son.

Image via Leon Logothetis/YouTube.

A month after this moment of kindness, James found himself still struggling. Because of the long wait to get into Denver day cares, James has to take his son with him to his job as a barber. He also had no reliable transportation for them from the homeless shelter where they're staying.

So a friend of James' who knew his predicament set up a page on GoFundMe to raise money for a reliable car. She set the goal at $20,000, hoping to collect at least enough donations to help in some way.

The page blasted through $24,000 in the first 24 hours it was online.

When he first received the news about the campaign, James was so floored by the generosity of strangers that he made a video to thank everyone who showed him and his son kindness.

"I never thought a small act of kindness like that would spark such a huge chain reaction."

At time of writing, the total is about $47,000 after about a week. James made the thank-you video after he saw the page when it was at just $6,000. Imagine how he'll react when he sees it now!

( The page is still live right here if you want to check it out!)

You can see his full thank-you video here (that's where this GIF is from).

But who is Leon, who started this kindness "chain reaction"?

Leon, who created the video about James' story, is a former London broker turned philanthropist/writer/motivational speaker. Ever since he quit his corporate life in search of one with purpose and hope, Leon's been traveling the globe to celebrate human connection and doing good.

"People often ask me if it's hard to find kindness and the answer is a resounding no," he told the Huffington Post in a recent interview. "It's amazing how when we just scratch the surface kindness comes bubbling up."

You can keep the kindness-fest going.

You don't need a $1,000 gift card to share an act of kindness. Leon's #GoBeKind campaign shares stories like James' to inspire us to show someone kindness in our own way.

Go show someone a little kindness. They may need it more than you know.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via CNN / Twitter

Eviction seemed imminent for Dasha Kelly, 32, and her three young daughters Sharron, 8; Kia, 6; and Imani, 5, on Monday. The eviction moratorium expired over the weekend and it looked like there was no way for them to avoid becoming homeless.

The former Las Vegas card dealer lost her job due to casino closures during the pandemic and needed $2,000 to cover her back rent. The mother of three couldn't bear the thought of being put out of her apartment with three children in the scorching Nevada desert.

"I had no idea what we were going to do," Kelly said, according to KOAT.

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