A 'Duck Dynasty' star claims that atheists don't exist. Here are 7 famous ones who prove him wrong.

In an interview with the Christian Post, "Duck Dynasty" star Si Robertson made a pretty odd claim: Atheists are not real.

Si Robertson, seen here yelling at clouds. Photo by Robert Laberge/Getty Images.


"I don't believe there's a such thing as an atheist," Robertson said. "Because there's too much documentation. Our calendars are based on Jesus Christ."

Now, I myself am not an atheist. But I definitely believe they exist. I'm even pretty sure I've met a few here and there. So I did what any researcher worth his salt would do: spent five minutes Googling. And turns out, atheists are real after all!

Not only do they exist, some of them are pretty famous.

1. Sir Richard Branson

Photo by Gustavo Caballero/Getty Images.

Not only does the Virgin CEO not believe in God, he doesn't believe in God despite miraculously surviving a balloon crash in 1987. That is hardcore committed atheism.

"I would love to believe. I think it's very comforting to believe," he said in a 2011 interview with CNN. "If somebody could convince me that there is a God, it'd be wonderful."

One of the great features of religion is that it teaches people to help those less fortunate, but not believing in God doesn't prevent Branson from using his massive personal wealth for good. His Virgin Management Group offers one of the most extensive parental leave policies. Branson has also pledged to give half his ludicrously huge fortune to charity.

2. Julianne Moore

Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images.

The mega-acclaimed actor has appeared in over 60 films, including "Far From Heaven," "The Hours," and "Boogie Nights." She has been nominated for five Academy Awards, and she scored her first win in 2015 for "Still Alice." All while not believing in God even a little bit.

3. Keira Knightley

Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images.

The veteran movie star told The Sun that she was an atheist way back in 2012. Then, as if to attempt to prove there is no God, she went on to not appear in "Pirates of the Caribbean 4." We missed you, Keira!

4. Billy Joel

Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images.

Despite the conviction of many Long Islanders that songs like "New York State of Mind," and "Scenes From an Italian Restaurant" must have been divinely inspired, Billy Joel is most def an atheist. And just try going to Massapequa and claiming that Billy Joel doesn't actually exist. It ... will almost definitely not end well for you.

5. James Cameron

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images.

A 2010 biography of the auteur behind "Avatar," "Terminator," and "Titanic" reveals that Cameron used to consider himself agnostic, but he flipped over to atheism once he started truly being honest with himself. And who could blame the guy? It's pretty much impossible to listen to "My Heart Will Go On" roughly 20,000 times — as Cameron must have in 1997 — and still believe in a benevolent god.

6. Kathy Griffin


Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images.

Not only is the comedian and former "D-List" star an atheist, she is, in her own words, a "complete militant atheist." Which is just slightly more atheist than a "totally not kidding atheist," and slightly less atheist than a "double dutch dog atheist times infinity." Either way, though, Griffin is obviously really really super atheist.

7. Stephen Hawking

Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Getty Images.

One of the most brilliant minds on planet Earth thinks God is great. As a metaphor for scientific discovery. But beyond that ... nah.

"What I meant by 'we would know the mind of God' is we would know everything that God would know, if there were a God, which there isn't. I'm an atheist," Hawking said in an 2014 interview with El Mundo.

Understandably, they left that quote out of "The Theory of Everything."

Religion is super cool and there's absolutely zero wrong with being totally into your religion of choice.

And even if really amazingly brilliant people like Hawking believe there is no God, atheism is just a belief, like any other belief. It deserves equal skepticism.

But atheism also deserves equal respect.

Which begins with, like, believing it's a real thing.

All glory to Darwin. Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images.

Atheism: It totally exists.

Sorry, Si. You'll get 'em next time.

We know that mammals feed their young with milk from their own bodies, and we know that whales are mammals. But the logistics of how some whales make breastfeeding happen has been a bit of a mystery for scientists. Such has been the case with sperm whales.

Sperm whales are uniquely shaped, with humongous, block-shaped heads that house the largest brains in the animal world. Like other cetaceans, sperm whale babies rely on their mother's milk for sustenance in their first year or two. And also like other cetaceans, a sperm whale mama's nipple is inverted—it doesn't stick out from her body like many mammals, but rather is hidden inside a mammary slit.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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