Vancouver Film School student Nata Metlukh made one very cool animation all about fear. Take a look:

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The animation makes a pretty simple (and helpful) point that's often forgotten: Fear isn't always bad.

See, we all face fear. Fear of critters, fear of heights, fear of losing our jobs, fear of losing small spaces, fear of heartbreaks.


Images by Nata Metlukh.

Many of our fears are associated with negative experiences and feelings.

So we've even come to fear fear itself. And rightfully so: Fear can have bad consequences for us, especially for the nearly 3.3 million American adults who suffer from anxiety.

Severe anxiety is like living with overwhelming fear and dread that stops you from functioning normally day-to-day. That's not a fun way to live. At all. In these cases, fear stops us from living.

But we often forget to ask the question "Why is fear there in the first place?"

Fear alerts us that our body is under siege, and it allows us to respond in ways that protect us. For example, a fear of cars can make us cautious when we go through a crosswalk.

Not having that kind of fear might land us in unfortunate situations.

Fear is an evolutionary emotion that can help us survive.

And studies have shown that fear is a natural part of human evolution that has helped us survive for centuries. For example, a recent study from Columbia University implies that humans evolved to fear spiders over millions of years, which helps protect us from these venomous critters. Other studies suggest that a fear of snakes — which can be cool, but can also kill us! — was an evolutionary trait as well.

So stop beating yourself up for being afraid! And remember: fear isn't always the bad guy. Sometimes, it might just save your life.



via Jeremy Hogan / YouTube

Vauhxx Booker, a civil rights activist from Bloomington, Indiana, claims that a group of white men threatened to lynch him during an altercation on July 4 near Lake Monroe, but he was saved by onlookers who intervened.

Video taken during the incident shows he was held down by a group of men who pinned him to a tree in a wooded area. Booker says that while he was being held down, the men threatened to break his arms, repeatedly said "get a noose," and told his friends to leave the area.

The men later let him go after being confronted by onlookers who gathered at the scene.

The incident began, according to Booker, when he and his friends were making their way to the lake to see the lunar eclipse when a white man on an ATV told them they were trespassing. When Booker and his friends continued to walk to the lake, the man on the ATV and his friends allegedly shouted "white power" at them, which is when things turned violent.

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