A Chrissy Teigen tweet sparked a great convo about maiden names: To keep or not to keep?

You know Chrissy Teigen, right? Author, model, unofficial queen of the witty tweet?

Photo by Robin Marchant/Getty Images for NARAS.

She's getting viral high-fives from fans again after responding to a question about keeping maiden names versus opting to take a partner's after marriage.

"I'd really like to hear the reasoning behind women who won't take their husband's last name," the Twitter user wrote.

To that, Teigen quipped, "My husband didn’t even take his last name?"


She is, of course, poking a bit of fun at her main squeeze, John Legend. His real last name is actually Stephens.

(Surprised? You're not the only one.)

Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images.

But the lighthearted tweet sparked a great conversation in the replies.

Teigen's remarks resonated with lots of women for various reasons: equality, tradition — even just wanting to avoid the hassle of signing papers.

Many hinted at the inherent sexism rooted in women feeling pressure to change their names: "I already have [a last name]," one person wrote. "I have my own money and career too. Imagine that."

The reasoning was about practicality to others. Who needs unnecessary paperwork, after all? "Skip all that," someone else chimed in. "Keep what you got." (Although, others said the time it took to change their name was next to nothing.)

For some who chose to keep their last name, the decision held special meaning: "My name is part of who I am, as well as a connection to my father, who died several years before I got married."

Have women's perspectives on maiden names shifted over time?

Research suggests yes — but not as much as you might think.

Recent trends in the U.S. indicate slightly more women are deciding to keep their maiden names now than in the 1980s and 1990s, according to analysis by The New York Times from 2015. Current estimates point to about one-fifth of women opting out of changing names after marriage nowadays — just slightly more than women in the bell-bottomed 1970s, which birthed the "Ms." movement.

But data shouldn't dictate personal decisions. Everyone choosing to tie the knot — including LGBTQ people in queer relationships — should be able to decide what name suits them best, free of judgement or stigma, right?

Live and let live (happily ever after).

True

When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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