Chrissy Teigen celebrates her freedom after being unfollowed on Twitter by President Biden
via Walt Disney Television / Flickr and jilhervas / Flickr

There comes a moment in everyone's social media life when they get stressed because they've been followed by an authority figure. When your boss, mother, or priest starts following you, social media immediately becomes a lot less fun.

When that happens, it's time to stop posting photos of yourself partying it up with an adult beverage. You gotta hold back on some of your saltier takes, and you have to start minding your language. Also, you have to be very careful about the posts you're tagged in.

Model, TV personality, and author Chrissy Teigen has been suffering through a mega-dose of this form of social media stress since January 20 when President Joe Biden followed her on Twitter. His follow came after Teigen made the request.


Teigen is one of the most popular voices on Twitter with over 13.7 million followers.

On January 19, after the inauguration, the @POTUS Twitter feed was turned over from Donald Trump to Joe Biden. Teigen is a vocal supporter of the new president and thought being followed by him would be nice after spending nearly four years blocked by former President Trump.

Teigen, a staunch Trump critic, was blocked by him after tweeting "lol no one likes you" in response to a tweet lashing out at his own party for not being supportive enough.

It's unclear why he was angry about the lack of support, but he was dealing with the Russia investigation and Obamacare repeal at that time.

"It's very sad that Republicans, even some that were carried over the line on my back, do very little to protect their President," he tweeted (although you can't read it now because he's been banned from the platform).

Well, the day after he was inaugurated, Joe Biden followed Teigen making her one of only 11 accounts he follows. The rest are cabinet members and family. At the time, Teigen appeared to be pleased with the new follower, writing, "my heart oh my god lmao I can finally see the president's tweets and they probably won't be unhinged."

However, in the coming days, the follow caused Teigen an incredible amount of Twitter stress. How would you feel knowing that just about everything you tweeted would be seen by the president?

As they say, be careful what you wish for, you just might get it.

This caused Teigen to be more thoughtful about what she shared on Twitter and reduced the number of tweets she made each day.

Earlier today, she asked Biden to unfollow her so that she could flourish. "I love you!!! it's not you it's me" she wrote.

After that, the president set her free with an unfollow.

She tweeted a sigh of relief. Now, she can use all of the colorful language she wants without having to endure the potential scrutiny of the president.

Although it must be freeing for Teigen to be able to say what she wants, her move may have been a little short-sighted. Who wouldn't want to be able to have a direct line to the president of the United States whenever they want?

This article originally appeared on November 11, 2015


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The best!

If that doesn't ring a bell, perhaps this character from the "Busytown" series will. Classic!

Image via

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Photo by Maxim Hopman on Unsplash

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