+

As chaos ensued at airports across the country after President Donald Trump issued an executive order banning travel to the U.S. from seven mostly Muslim countries, the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards rolled out the red carpet in Los Angeles.

If there's one thing we know to be true among Hollywood's A-listers, it's that actors hardly ever shy away from getting political. The awards show didn't go by without the immigration ban getting a mention.


Meryl Streep, Jocelyn Towne — with the words "let them in" on her chest in reference to Trump's immigration ban — and Simon Helberg. Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images.

While a few actors brought up the 45th president during their acceptance speeches — Bryan Cranston, who plays Lyndon B. Johnson in HBO's "All the Way" said LBJ would have told Trump not to "piss in the soup that all of us got to eat" — most actors actually didn't mention our reality-star-turned-world-leader by name, even as their speeches were powerful rebukes to Trumpism in this dark moment in U.S. history.

Here are seven times SAG Award recipients tore Trump's policies and ideas to shreds without ever having to utter his name:

1. Ashton Kutcher started things out with a bang, blasting the ban during the ceremony's very first opening lines.

"Good evening, fellow SAG-AFTRA members and everyone at home — and everyone in airports that belong in my America," Kutcher said loudly into the microphone. "You are a part of the fabric of who we are. And we love you, and we welcome you."

Photo by Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images.

"We also welcome you to the 23rd annual Screen Actors Guild Awards," he then quipped with a grin as the audience laughed.

2. Julia Louis-Dreyfus, who won Best Female Actor in a Comedy Series, spelled out why the ban hits so close to home for her.

"I want you all to know that I am the daughter of an immigrant," she said. "My father fled religious persecution in Nazi-occupied France, and I'm an American patriot, and I love this country. And because I love this country, I am horrified by its blemishes. And this immigrant ban is a blemish, and it's un-American."

Photo by John Sciulli/Getty Images for TNT.

3. David Harbour, who spoke on behalf of the cast of "Stranger Things," gave arguably the most blistering takedown of Trumpism of the night.

"As we act in the continuing narrative of 'Stranger Things,' we ... will repel bullies, we will shelter freaks and outcasts, those who have no home," Harbour said boldly on stage, his voice rising and hands shaking. "We will get past the lies, we will hunt monsters, and when we are at a loss amidst the hypocrisy and the casual violence of certain individuals and institutions, we will, as per chief Jim Hopper, punch some people in the face when they seek to destroy the weak, the disenfranchised, and we will do it all with soul, with heart, and with joy."

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for TNT.

Harbour's entire speech is worth the watch.

4. Taraji P. Henson, who accepted the SAG award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture on behalf of "Hidden Figures," called for an end to divisiveness while honoring the trailblazing women of color who made the film possible.  

"This film is about unity," Henson said. "We stand here as proud actors thanking every member of this incredible guild for voting for us, for recognizing our hard work. But the shoulders of the women that we stand on are three American heroes: Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan, and Mary Jackson. Without them, we would not know how to reach the stars."

Photo by John Sciulli/Getty Images for TNT.

5. Mahershala Ali, who is Muslim, spoke out about why religious tolerance is so vital in his speech accepting the award for Male Actor in a Supporting Role for "Moonlight."

"My mother is an ordained minister," Ali said. "I’m a Muslim. She didn’t do backflips when I called her to tell her I converted 17 years ago. But I tell you now ― you put things to the side, and I’m able to see her and she’s able to see me. We love each other. The love has grown."

Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for TNT.

The "Moonlight" star also explained why his character should be a role model for the rest of us:

"I think what I’ve learned from working on 'Moonlight' is we see what happens when you persecute people. They fold into themselves. And what I was so grateful about in having the opportunity to play Juan was playing a gentleman who saw a young man folding into himself as a result of the persecution of his community and taking that opportunity to uplift him and to tell him he mattered, that he was OK, and accept him. I hope that we do a better job of that."

6. Lily Tomlin, who was given a lifetime achievement award in part for her work in civil rights advocacy, couldn't resist a jab at Trumpism either.

She joked that the new administration has inspired her to start thinking about "what sign should [she] make for the next march: global warming, Standing Rock, LGBT issues, immigration — there are so many things."

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for TNT.

7. And Sarah Paulson received one of the most cheered lines of the night when she encouraged viewers to donate to the ACLU — the group responsible for challenging (and winning) a temporary stay on Trump's immigration ban.

"I would like to make plea for everyone, if they can, any money they have to spare please donate to the ACLU to protect the rights and liberties of people across this country," said Paulson, who won for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Television Movie or Limited Series, adding the ACLU is "a vital organization that relies entirely on our support."

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for TNT.

We are only on day 11 of Trump's presidency (yep, it will be a grueling four years). But don't expect Hollywood — or the millions of others who'll be affected by this administration — to shut up anytime soon. There's too much on the line.

Joy

Nurse turns inappropriate things men say in the delivery room into ‘inspirational’ art

"Can you move to the birthing ball so I can sleep in the bed?"

Holly the delivery nurse.

After working six years as a labor and delivery nurse Holly, 30, has heard a lot of inappropriate remarks made by men while their partners are in labor. “Sometimes the moms think it’s funny—and if they think it’s funny, then I’ll laugh with them,” Holly told TODAY Parents. “But if they get upset, I’ll try to be the buffer. I’ll change the subject.”

Some of the comments are so wrong that she did something creative with them by turning them into “inspirational” quotes and setting them to “A Thousand Miles” by Vanessa Carlton on TikTok.

“Some partners are hard to live up to!” she jokingly captioned the video.

Keep ReadingShow less
All images provided by Adewole Adamson

It begins with more inclusive conversations at a patient level

True

Adewole Adamson, MD, of the University of Texas, Austin, aims to create more equity in health care by gathering data from more diverse populations by using artificial intelligence (AI), a type of machine learning. Dr. Adamson’s work is funded by the American Cancer Society (ACS), an organization committed to advancing health equity through research priorities, programs and services for groups who have been marginalized.

Melanoma became a particular focus for Dr. Adamson after meeting Avery Smith, who lost his wife—a Black woman—to the deadly disease.

melanoma,  melanoma for dark skin Avery Smith (left) and Adamson (sidenote)

This personal encounter, coupled with multiple conversations with Black dermatology patients, drove Dr. Adamson to a concerning discovery: as advanced as AI is at detecting possible skin cancers, it is heavily biased.

To understand this bias, it helps to first know how AI works in the early detection of skin cancer, which Dr. Adamson explains in his paper for the New England Journal of Medicine (paywall). The process uses computers that rely on sets of accumulated data to learn what healthy or unhealthy skin looks like and then create an algorithm to predict diagnoses based on those data sets.

This process, known as supervised learning, could lead to huge benefits in preventive care.

After all, early detection is key to better outcomes. The problem is that the data sets don’t include enough information about darker skin tones. As Adamson put it, “everything is viewed through a ‘white lens.’”

“If you don’t teach the algorithm with a diverse set of images, then that algorithm won’t work out in the public that is diverse,” writes Adamson in a study he co-wrote with Smith (according to a story in The Atlantic). “So there’s risk, then, for people with skin of color to fall through the cracks.”

Tragically, Smith’s wife was diagnosed with melanoma too late and paid the ultimate price for it. And she was not an anomaly—though the disease is more common for White patients, Black cancer patients are far more likely to be diagnosed at later stages, causing a notable disparity in survival rates between non-Hispanics whites (90%) and non-Hispanic blacks (66%).

As a computer scientist, Smith suspected this racial bias and reached out to Adamson, hoping a Black dermatologist would have more diverse data sets. Though Adamson didn’t have what Smith was initially looking for, this realization ignited a personal mission to investigate and reduce disparities.

Now, Adamson uses the knowledge gained through his years of research to help advance the fight for health equity. To him, that means not only gaining a wider array of data sets, but also having more conversations with patients to understand how socioeconomic status impacts the level and efficiency of care.

“At the end of the day, what matters most is how we help patients at the patient level,” Adamson told Upworthy. “And how can you do that without knowing exactly what barriers they face?”

american cancer society, skin cacner treatment"What matters most is how we help patients at the patient level."https://www.kellydavidsonstudio.com/

The American Cancer Society believes everyone deserves a fair and just opportunity to prevent, find, treat, and survive cancer—regardless of how much money they make, the color of their skin, their sexual orientation, gender identity, their disability status, or where they live. Inclusive tools and resources on the Health Equity section of their website can be found here. For more information about skin cancer, visit cancer.org/skincancer.

The mesmerizing lost art of darning knit fabric.

For most of human history, people had to make their own clothing by hand, and sewing skills were subsequently passed down from generation to generation. Because clothing was so time-consuming and labor-intensive to make, people also had to know how to repair clothing items that got torn or damaged in some way.

The invention of sewing and knitting machines changed the way we acquire clothing, and the skills people used to possess have largely gone by the wayside. If we get a hole in a sock nowadays, we toss it and replace it. Most of us have no idea how to darn a sock or fix a hole in any knit fabric. It's far easier for us to replace than to repair.

But there are still some among us who do have the skills to repair clothing in a way that makes it look like the rip, tear or hole never happened, and to watch them do it is mesmerizing.

Keep ReadingShow less
Pop Culture

Artist uses AI to create ultra realistic portraits of celebrities who left us too soon

What would certain icons look like if nothing had happened to them?

Mercury would be 76 today.

Some icons have truly left this world too early. It’s a tragedy when anyone doesn’t make it to see old age, but when it happens to a well-known public figure, it’s like a bit of their art and legacy dies with them. What might Freddie Mercury have created if he were granted the gift of long life? Bruce Lee? Princess Diana?

Their futures might be mere musings of our imagination, but thanks to a lot of creativity (and a little tech) we can now get a glimpse into what these celebrities might have looked like when they were older.

Alper Yesiltas, an Istanbul-based lawyer and photographer, created a photography series titled “As If Nothing Happened,” which features eerily realistic portraits of long gone celebrities in their golden years. To make the images as real looking as possible, Yesiltas incorporated various photo editing programs such as Adobe Lightroom and VSCO, as well as the AI photo-enhancing software Remini.

“The hardest part of the creative process for me is making the image feel ‘real’ to me,” Yesiltas wrote about his passion project. “The moment I like the most is when I think the image in front of me looks as if it was taken by a photographer.”

Yesiltas’ meticulousness paid off, because the results are uncanny.

Along with each photo, Yesiltas writes a bittersweet message “wishing” how things might have gone differently … as if nothing happened.
Keep ReadingShow less