7 times SAG Award winners slammed Trumpism without mentioning him by name.

As chaos ensued at airports across the country after President Donald Trump issued an executive order banning travel to the U.S. from seven mostly Muslim countries, the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards rolled out the red carpet in Los Angeles.

If there's one thing we know to be true among Hollywood's A-listers, it's that actors hardly ever shy away from getting political. The awards show didn't go by without the immigration ban getting a mention.


Meryl Streep, Jocelyn Towne — with the words "let them in" on her chest in reference to Trump's immigration ban — and Simon Helberg. Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images.

While a few actors brought up the 45th president during their acceptance speeches — Bryan Cranston, who plays Lyndon B. Johnson in HBO's "All the Way" said LBJ would have told Trump not to "piss in the soup that all of us got to eat" — most actors actually didn't mention our reality-star-turned-world-leader by name, even as their speeches were powerful rebukes to Trumpism in this dark moment in U.S. history.

Here are seven times SAG Award recipients tore Trump's policies and ideas to shreds without ever having to utter his name:

1. Ashton Kutcher started things out with a bang, blasting the ban during the ceremony's very first opening lines.

"Good evening, fellow SAG-AFTRA members and everyone at home — and everyone in airports that belong in my America," Kutcher said loudly into the microphone. "You are a part of the fabric of who we are. And we love you, and we welcome you."

Photo by Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images.

"We also welcome you to the 23rd annual Screen Actors Guild Awards," he then quipped with a grin as the audience laughed.

2. Julia Louis-Dreyfus, who won Best Female Actor in a Comedy Series, spelled out why the ban hits so close to home for her.

"I want you all to know that I am the daughter of an immigrant," she said. "My father fled religious persecution in Nazi-occupied France, and I'm an American patriot, and I love this country. And because I love this country, I am horrified by its blemishes. And this immigrant ban is a blemish, and it's un-American."

Photo by John Sciulli/Getty Images for TNT.

3. David Harbour, who spoke on behalf of the cast of "Stranger Things," gave arguably the most blistering takedown of Trumpism of the night.

"As we act in the continuing narrative of 'Stranger Things,' we ... will repel bullies, we will shelter freaks and outcasts, those who have no home," Harbour said boldly on stage, his voice rising and hands shaking. "We will get past the lies, we will hunt monsters, and when we are at a loss amidst the hypocrisy and the casual violence of certain individuals and institutions, we will, as per chief Jim Hopper, punch some people in the face when they seek to destroy the weak, the disenfranchised, and we will do it all with soul, with heart, and with joy."

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for TNT.

Harbour's entire speech is worth the watch.

4. Taraji P. Henson, who accepted the SAG award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture on behalf of "Hidden Figures," called for an end to divisiveness while honoring the trailblazing women of color who made the film possible.  

"This film is about unity," Henson said. "We stand here as proud actors thanking every member of this incredible guild for voting for us, for recognizing our hard work. But the shoulders of the women that we stand on are three American heroes: Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan, and Mary Jackson. Without them, we would not know how to reach the stars."

Photo by John Sciulli/Getty Images for TNT.

5. Mahershala Ali, who is Muslim, spoke out about why religious tolerance is so vital in his speech accepting the award for Male Actor in a Supporting Role for "Moonlight."

"My mother is an ordained minister," Ali said. "I’m a Muslim. She didn’t do backflips when I called her to tell her I converted 17 years ago. But I tell you now ― you put things to the side, and I’m able to see her and she’s able to see me. We love each other. The love has grown."

Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for TNT.

The "Moonlight" star also explained why his character should be a role model for the rest of us:

"I think what I’ve learned from working on 'Moonlight' is we see what happens when you persecute people. They fold into themselves. And what I was so grateful about in having the opportunity to play Juan was playing a gentleman who saw a young man folding into himself as a result of the persecution of his community and taking that opportunity to uplift him and to tell him he mattered, that he was OK, and accept him. I hope that we do a better job of that."

6. Lily Tomlin, who was given a lifetime achievement award in part for her work in civil rights advocacy, couldn't resist a jab at Trumpism either.

She joked that the new administration has inspired her to start thinking about "what sign should [she] make for the next march: global warming, Standing Rock, LGBT issues, immigration — there are so many things."

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for TNT.

7. And Sarah Paulson received one of the most cheered lines of the night when she encouraged viewers to donate to the ACLU — the group responsible for challenging (and winning) a temporary stay on Trump's immigration ban.

"I would like to make plea for everyone, if they can, any money they have to spare please donate to the ACLU to protect the rights and liberties of people across this country," said Paulson, who won for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Television Movie or Limited Series, adding the ACLU is "a vital organization that relies entirely on our support."

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for TNT.

We are only on day 11 of Trump's presidency (yep, it will be a grueling four years). But don't expect Hollywood — or the millions of others who'll be affected by this administration — to shut up anytime soon. There's too much on the line.

Images courtesy of Mark Storhaug & Kaiya Bates

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The experiences we have at school tend to stay with us throughout our lives. It's an impactful time where small acts of kindness, encouragement, and inspiration go a long way.

Schools, classrooms, and teachers that are welcoming and inclusive support students' development and help set them up for a positive and engaging path in life.

Here are three of our favorite everyday actions that are spreading kindness on campus in a big way:

Image courtesy of Mark Storhaug

1. Pickleball to Get Fifth Graders Moving

Mark Storhaug is a 5th grade teacher at Kingsley Elementary in Los Angeles, who wants to use pickleball to get his students "moving on the playground again after 15 months of being Zombies learning at home."

Pickleball is a paddle ball sport that mixes elements of badminton, table tennis, and tennis, where two or four players use solid paddles to hit a perforated plastic ball over a net. It's as simple as that.

Kingsley Elementary is in a low-income neighborhood where outdoor spaces where kids can move around are minimal. Mark's goal is to get two or three pickleball courts set up in the schoolyard and have kids join in on what's quickly becoming a national craze. Mark hopes that pickleball will promote movement and teamwork for all his students. He aims to take advantage of the 20-minute physical education time allotted each day to introduce the game to his students.

Help Mark get his students outside, exercising, learning to cooperate, and having fun by donating to his GoFundMe.

Image courtesy of Kaiya Bates

2. Staying C.A.L.M: Regulation Kits for Kids

According to the WHO around 280 million people worldwide suffer from depression. In the US, 1 in 5 adults experience mental illness and 1 in 20 experience severe mental illness, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

Kaiya Bates, who was recently crowned Miss Tri-Cities Outstanding Teen for 2022, is one of those people, and has endured severe anxiety, depression, and selective mutism for most of her life.

Through her GoFundMe, Kaiya aims to use her "knowledge to inspire and help others through their mental health journey and to spread positive and factual awareness."

She's put together regulation kits (that she's used herself) for teachers to use with students who are experiencing stress and anxiety. Each "CALM-ing" kit includes a two-minute timer, fidget toolboxes, storage crates, breathing spheres, art supplies and more.

Kaiya's GoFundMe goal is to send a kit to every teacher in every school in the Pasco School District in Washington where she lives.

To help Kaiya achieve her goal, visit Staying C.A.L.M: Regulation Kits for Kids.

Image courtesy of Julie Tarman

3. Library for a high school heritage Spanish class

Julie Tarman is a high school Spanish teacher in Sacramento, California, who hopes to raise enough money to create a Spanish language class library.

The school is in a low-income area, and although her students come from Spanish-speaking homes, they need help building their fluency, confidence, and vocabulary through reading Spanish language books that will actually interest them.

Julie believes that creating a library that affirms her students' cultural heritage will allow them to discover the joy of reading, learn new things about the world, and be supported in their academic futures.

To support Julie's GoFundMe, visit Library for a high school heritage Spanish class.

Do YOU have an idea for a fundraiser that could make a difference? Upworthy and GoFundMe are celebrating ideas that make the world a better, kinder place. Visit upworthy.com/kindness to join the largest collaboration for human kindness in history and start your own GoFundMe.

Image is a representation of the grandfather, not the anonymous subject of the story.

Eight years a go, a grandfather in Michigan wrote a powerful letter to his daughter after she kicked out her son out of the house for being gay. It's so perfectly written that it crops up on social media every so often.

The letter is beautiful because it's written by a man who may not be with the times, but his heart is in the right place.

It first appeared on the Facebook page FCKH8 and a representative told Gawker that the letter was given to them by Chad, the 16-year-old boy referenced in the letter.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."