7 times SAG Award winners slammed Trumpism without mentioning him by name.

As chaos ensued at airports across the country after President Donald Trump issued an executive order banning travel to the U.S. from seven mostly Muslim countries, the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards rolled out the red carpet in Los Angeles.

If there's one thing we know to be true among Hollywood's A-listers, it's that actors hardly ever shy away from getting political. The awards show didn't go by without the immigration ban getting a mention.


Meryl Streep, Jocelyn Towne — with the words "let them in" on her chest in reference to Trump's immigration ban — and Simon Helberg. Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images.

While a few actors brought up the 45th president during their acceptance speeches — Bryan Cranston, who plays Lyndon B. Johnson in HBO's "All the Way" said LBJ would have told Trump not to "piss in the soup that all of us got to eat" — most actors actually didn't mention our reality-star-turned-world-leader by name, even as their speeches were powerful rebukes to Trumpism in this dark moment in U.S. history.

Here are seven times SAG Award recipients tore Trump's policies and ideas to shreds without ever having to utter his name:

1. Ashton Kutcher started things out with a bang, blasting the ban during the ceremony's very first opening lines.

"Good evening, fellow SAG-AFTRA members and everyone at home — and everyone in airports that belong in my America," Kutcher said loudly into the microphone. "You are a part of the fabric of who we are. And we love you, and we welcome you."

Photo by Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images.

"We also welcome you to the 23rd annual Screen Actors Guild Awards," he then quipped with a grin as the audience laughed.

2. Julia Louis-Dreyfus, who won Best Female Actor in a Comedy Series, spelled out why the ban hits so close to home for her.

"I want you all to know that I am the daughter of an immigrant," she said. "My father fled religious persecution in Nazi-occupied France, and I'm an American patriot, and I love this country. And because I love this country, I am horrified by its blemishes. And this immigrant ban is a blemish, and it's un-American."

Photo by John Sciulli/Getty Images for TNT.

3. David Harbour, who spoke on behalf of the cast of "Stranger Things," gave arguably the most blistering takedown of Trumpism of the night.

"As we act in the continuing narrative of 'Stranger Things,' we ... will repel bullies, we will shelter freaks and outcasts, those who have no home," Harbour said boldly on stage, his voice rising and hands shaking. "We will get past the lies, we will hunt monsters, and when we are at a loss amidst the hypocrisy and the casual violence of certain individuals and institutions, we will, as per chief Jim Hopper, punch some people in the face when they seek to destroy the weak, the disenfranchised, and we will do it all with soul, with heart, and with joy."

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for TNT.

Harbour's entire speech is worth the watch.

4. Taraji P. Henson, who accepted the SAG award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture on behalf of "Hidden Figures," called for an end to divisiveness while honoring the trailblazing women of color who made the film possible.  

"This film is about unity," Henson said. "We stand here as proud actors thanking every member of this incredible guild for voting for us, for recognizing our hard work. But the shoulders of the women that we stand on are three American heroes: Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan, and Mary Jackson. Without them, we would not know how to reach the stars."

Photo by John Sciulli/Getty Images for TNT.

5. Mahershala Ali, who is Muslim, spoke out about why religious tolerance is so vital in his speech accepting the award for Male Actor in a Supporting Role for "Moonlight."

"My mother is an ordained minister," Ali said. "I’m a Muslim. She didn’t do backflips when I called her to tell her I converted 17 years ago. But I tell you now ― you put things to the side, and I’m able to see her and she’s able to see me. We love each other. The love has grown."

Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for TNT.

The "Moonlight" star also explained why his character should be a role model for the rest of us:

"I think what I’ve learned from working on 'Moonlight' is we see what happens when you persecute people. They fold into themselves. And what I was so grateful about in having the opportunity to play Juan was playing a gentleman who saw a young man folding into himself as a result of the persecution of his community and taking that opportunity to uplift him and to tell him he mattered, that he was OK, and accept him. I hope that we do a better job of that."

6. Lily Tomlin, who was given a lifetime achievement award in part for her work in civil rights advocacy, couldn't resist a jab at Trumpism either.

She joked that the new administration has inspired her to start thinking about "what sign should [she] make for the next march: global warming, Standing Rock, LGBT issues, immigration — there are so many things."

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for TNT.

7. And Sarah Paulson received one of the most cheered lines of the night when she encouraged viewers to donate to the ACLU — the group responsible for challenging (and winning) a temporary stay on Trump's immigration ban.

"I would like to make plea for everyone, if they can, any money they have to spare please donate to the ACLU to protect the rights and liberties of people across this country," said Paulson, who won for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Television Movie or Limited Series, adding the ACLU is "a vital organization that relies entirely on our support."

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for TNT.

We are only on day 11 of Trump's presidency (yep, it will be a grueling four years). But don't expect Hollywood — or the millions of others who'll be affected by this administration — to shut up anytime soon. There's too much on the line.

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