6 surprising things they didn't tell me about becoming an aunt.

I’ve been an aunt to a little girl for the past 14 months, and soon I’ll become an aunt to a little boy.

And I can’t wait! When I found out I was going to become an aunt the first time, I was ecstatic. But there were a couple things that came along with being an aunt that caught me by surprise. I thought I knew a lot about being an aunt; I’ve got three aunts that I see regularly. What didn’t I know? Life wouldn’t be that different, right?


Photo via iStock.

They didn’t tell me that…

1. Seeing your niece or nephew for the first time will turn you into a blubbering fool.

I thought only moms and grandparents cried when they saw babies. Aunts are supposed to be the cool ones that just give the kids candy when their mom isn’t looking, right? What’s this crying business? Eyes. Stop. Now. You’re embarrassing me.

2. I would become strangely protective over a child that isn’t even mine and that I haven’t even known for very long.

Did I just hear you cough? Commence dousing you with hand sanitizer if you want to be in the same room as my niece.

3. I would want to buy every decently cute item of baby clothing in sight.

Oh, she already has 50 dresses … but this one is so cute! I only have $20 in my banking account. Good thing this adorable dress is only $15!

4. I’d become extremely selfish when it comes to letting other people hold her or play with her.

I don’t care if you are a second cousin twice removed who loves babies and only comes around every two years. I’m NOT sharing her. Ever.

5. My priorities would change.

They didn’t tell me that I’d come home more often, just to spend time with her. They didn’t tell me I’d leave an hour earlier just so I could stop by on my way home before her afternoon nap. They didn’t tell me I’d blow off hanging with my friends just so I could play with her for half an hour longer. They didn’t tell me that I would begin to factor her into my choice of graduate schools.

6. I’d love that kid more than anybody in this world.

They didn’t tell me that from the first moment I laid eyes on her, I would be hooked. They didn’t tell me that from the moment I met her, I would do anything and everything for her. They didn’t tell me that her laugh would become one of my most favorite things to hear. They didn’t tell me that she’d take over my Facebook and Instagram. They didn’t tell me that she’d also take over my lock screen on my phone. They didn’t tell me that I would work her into every conversation, just so I can show them the latest pictures of her.

No one told me any of that, but I’m so glad they didn’t.

Being an aunt has been one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever done, and I can’t wait to do it all over again when my nephew comes in a few months.

So here’s to one of my newest and definitely my best title yet: Aunt Courtney.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

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